Randolph High School Program of Studies

  • CHAPTER 622
    In compliance with Chapter 622 and Title IX, the Randolph Public Schools follows the law that reads:

    No person shall be excluded from or discriminated against in admission to a public school of any town or in obtaining the advantages, privileges and course of study of such public school on account of race, sex, sexual identity, religion, or national origin of such child.

    RHS VISION STATEMENT
    Each Randolph High School student will reach their full potential by demonstrating high levels of growth and achievement in a respectful and inclusive environment that honors and celebrates our diverse community.

    CORE VALUES

    Continuous Reflection and Improvement

    Academic Excellence and Innovation

    Respectful and Responsible Relationships

    Engaged and Equitable Community

     

    ACADEMIC EXPECTATIONS FOR STUDENT LEARNING

    Students at RHS are expected to:

    1) Listen and read actively to comprehend, interpret, and analyze meaning
    2) Write and speak effectively with clarity and purpose
    3) Think critically and creatively to evaluate and solve problems
    4) Research, examine, and synthesize information
    5) Demonstrate real world applications of knowledge and skill
    6) Utilize technology and medial to enhance the learning process

     

    SOCIAL EXPECTATIONS FOR STUDENT LEARNING

    Students at RHS are expected to:

    7) Act with respect, integrity, and compassion
    8) Make informed decisions regarding the health and wellbeing of themselves and others
    9) Demonstrate responsibility for their action

    CIVIC EXPECTATIONS FOR STUDENT LEARNING

    Students at RHS are expected to:

    10) Cultivate their awareness of contributing to the common good
    11) Advocate for the positive change through active participation in the democratic process
    12) Broaden their knowledge of and respect for world culture

    ADMINISTRATION & GUIDANCE DEPARTMENT

    • To contact a counselor, teacher or staff member, please call 781-961-6220 and enter the individual’s extension. You may also use the dial by name feature by pressing 9.
    • To email a faculty or staff member please go to the school website: https://www.randolph.k12.ma.us/rhs and click on the link for “Staff Directory”.


    RHS Administration & School Counseling Office Staff

    Extension

    William Conard, Principal

    X 525

    Annya Haughton, Assistant Principal

    X 593

    David Pierce, Assistant Principal

    X 516

    Julie Burke, Student Behavioral Specialist

    X 533

    Mary Brown-Jones, Guidance Counselor (A-F)

    X 513

    Tivichheka Hok, Guidance Counselor (G-N)

    X 514

    Julia Tavares, Guidance Counselor (O-Z)

    X 536

    Patti Davis, Guidance Secretary

    X 520

  • The Program of Studies contains information necessary to select courses for the academic school year. Parents/guardians should be aware of their responsibilities in course selection.

    Responsibilities of Students and Parents/Guardians

    • To be aware of all graduation requirements and to have a plan for meeting those requirements.
    • To review the established plan each year and check for completed graduation requirements.
    • To ensure that a student's time spent at Randolph High School is productive by choosing courses relevant to his/her academic and career interest while challenging his/her abilities.
    • To work with the Counseling Department addressing academic or personal/social challenges.
    • To be aware of the scheduling deadlines for adding and dropping courses.

     

    SCHEDULING AND POLICY FOR COURSE CHANGES
    Randolph High School’s master schedule is a listing of all course offerings in alignment with our graduation requirements and student interest. The master schedule incorporates student course selections to determine teacher assignments and numbers of sections of courses offered. The course selection process is a collaborative decision between students, families and school personnel; therefore, the expectation is that decisions are made thoughtfully and responsibly.  

    Below is our current course change policy:

    • No schedule change requests will be honored within the first five days of enrollment in a course/s.
    • If a change has been granted, students are required to remain in the new course for the remainder of the school year (if year-long course) or semester (if semester-long course) and to complete any work missed.
    • While some changes may be made, it should be clearly understood that requests will not automatically be honored or approved.

     The course change requests for the reasons below will not be approved:

    • Not interested/no longer interested in a course
    • Underestimating the course expectations
    • Selecting or avoiding a specific teacher
    • Looking to take an easier course
    • Not realizing what the course would be like
    • Wishing to be in class with friends
    • Wanting to attend a specific lunch

    Dropping a course may result in a final grade of WP (Withdrawal Passing) or WF (Withdrawal Failing) on the student’s transcript.

    REQUESTING A COURSE LEVEL OVERRIDE
    Course levels are determined by teachers and department chairs based on teacher recommendations, previous grades, and course prerequisites. If a parent/guardian is interested in overriding a teacher recommendation, an override form must be completed.  Students wishing to make a course override must meet with their Guidance Counselor to discuss and pick up the form.

    CREDIT INFORMATION
    Randolph High School students enroll in a minimum of 7 credits of study. Students accumulate credit on their high school transcripts from courses successfully completed during grades 9-12 only. The Administration must approve all credit taken outside Randolph High School. No more than two summer school make-up credits can be counted toward graduation requirements. Enrichment courses taken during the summer are not eligible for credit and are not listed on the Randolph High School transcript. No credit will be given for a course previously passed but repeated to improve proficiency; the repeated course may not be used in determining eligibility for interscholastic athletics.

    COVID-19 CREDIT ADJUSTMENT
    Due to the reduction in scheduled courses taken during the 2020-2020 academic year, credit requirements to graduate are also reduced from the 25 traditional course credits to 23 for the classes of 2021, 2022, 2023, and 2024. Credit requirements for English, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies and World Language will not change, but students will only be required to earn six(6) additional credits instead of nine(9) through study in Wellness, Visual/Performing Arts, and electives.

    RANDOLPH HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

    Department

    Credits

    English

    4

    Mathematics

    4

    Science

    3

    Social Studies

    3

    World Language

    2

    Wellness/Physical Education

    2*

    Visual/Performing Arts

    1*

    Electives

    6*

    Minimum Credits for Graduation

    25*

    *Adjusted credit requirements based on COVID-19 scheduling.

    RHS Additional Credit Requirement: In some circumstances, students may choose to take courses through other secondary schools. While this may offer students the opportunity to take courses not offered at RHS, all students are required to complete 80% of their academic coursework through RHS in order to obtain an RHS diploma. That limits students to 5 total credits they can obtain from other high school programs (online, summer, etc.).

    Students must also pass English, Math, and Science MCAS exams. The principal may waive some graduation requirements for students with severe language-based learning disabilities.

    PROMOTION REQUIREMENTS 

    Grade 9 to 10

    Students must have passed English I and Math

    Traditionally Earn 6 Credits
    COVID Adjustment:
    Class of 2024: 4 Credits

    Grade 10 to 11

    Students must have passed English II

    Traditionally Earn 12 Credits
    COVID Adjustment:
    Class of 2023: 10 Credits

    Grade 11 to 12

    Students must have passed English III

    Traditionally Earn 18 Credits
    COVID Adjustment:
    Class of 2022: 16 Credits

    Grade 12 to Graduation

    Students must have passed English IV

    Traditionally Earn 25 Credits Pass MCAS (ELA, Math and STE)
    COVID Adjustment:
    Class of 2021: 23 Credits

     

    Massachusetts Public College and University Minimum Admissions Standards

    • 4 Years English
    • 4 Years Math (minimum of Algebra I, Algebra II, Geometry)
    • 3 Years Lab-based Science
    • 2 Years Social Studies (including 1 credit in U.S. History)
    • 2 Years World Language (in the same language)
    • 2 Years Electives

    Ideal Program for Entrance to Selective Colleges

    • 4 Years English
    • 4 Years Math
    • 4 Years Science
    • 4 Years Social Studies
    • 4 Years World Language

    MASSCORE REQUIREMENTS – STATE COLLEGES & UNIVERSITIES 

    English Language Arts

    4 Units

    Mathematics

    4 Units-Including the completion of Algebra II or completion of the Integrated Math equivalent.

    Science 3 Units of lab-based science

    3 Units of Lab-Based Science

    Coursework taken in technology/engineering may count for MassCore science credit.

    History/Social Science

    3 Units – Including US History and World History

    World Language

    2 Units – Must be same language

    Wellness/Physical Education

    2 Unites – One course every year as required by law.

    Visual/Performing Arts**

    1 Unit

    Additional Core Courses

    5 Units – Business Education, Career and Technical Education (CTE), Health, Technology or any of the subjects above.

     

    22 Units is a minimum that students should take in High School.

    Additional Learning Opportunities

    Complete as many of the following as possible: Advanced Placement (AP); Capstone or Senior Project; Dual Enrollment courses taken for both high school and college credit;

    Online courses; Service Learning; and Work-based Learning.

    **A unit represents a full academic year of study or its equivalent in a subject that covers all the standards contained in a specific Curriculum Framework.

    MassCore is the recommended program of study that Massachusetts high school students need in order to be better prepared for college and a career. Developed by a statewide advisory group from K-12, higher education and business sectors, MassCore maintains flexibility for students and high schools while allowing districts to set additional graduation requirements. Courses included in MassCore should be rigorous, engaging, and based on appropriate Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks and high school level standards.

    COURSE VALUE AND CREDIT LEVELS
    In a year, most academic courses will meet 5 times in a week and 1.0 credit will be granted per course. Courses meeting for one semester receive 0.5 credit.

    All courses offered at Randolph High School emphasize critical thinking and are leveled according to difficulty. There are three levels: Advanced Placement, Honors, and College Preparatory.

    GRADE POINT AVERAGES AND CLASS RANK
    A Grade Point Average (GPA) will be calculated for each Randolph High School student. Only courses that are both graded and leveled shall be included in the calculation of the GPA. The official GPA is calculated at the end of the year. Final ranking is done after grades are entered in the 4th quarter of the senior year. 

    Letter

    Grade

    %

    Value

    College

    Prep

    Honors

    AP Courses

    Points

    A+

    97-100

    4.3

    4.8

    5.3

    A

    93-96

    4.0

    4.5

    5.0

    A-

    90-92

    3.7

    4.2

    4.7

    B+

    87-89

    3.3

    3.8

    4.3

    B

    83-86

    3.0

    3.5

    4.0

    B-

    80-82

    2.7

    3.2

    3.7

    C+

    77-79

    2.3

    2.8

    3.3

    C

    73-76

    2.0

    2.5

    3.0

    C-

    70-72

    1.7

    2.2

    2.7

    D+

    67-69

    1.3

    1.8

    2.3

    D

    63-66

    1.0

    1.5

    2.0

    D-

    60-62

    0.7

    1.2

    1.7

    F

    59 & below

    0.0

    0.0

    0.0

    I

    Incomplete

    0.0

    0.0

    0.0


    ADVANCED PLACEMENT
    AP courses are taught at the college level and are designed to address a broader content, at a deeper level, and at a faster pace than required by the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks. A great amount of outside reading is required. Students may have the opportunity to earn college credit with passing scores on AP exams. While the patterns of behavior and demonstrable skills listed below are important at all levels of study, they are essential for students participating in an AP course.

    1. Displays an enthusiastic disposition to think critically and analytically, and enjoys engaging in discussions of abstract concepts and ideas
    2. Demonstrates a strong interest and passion for the subject matter
    3. Shows both willingness and ability to commit the time and effort necessary to handle a rigorous course load.

    In addition, there are certain demonstrable skills that support successful participation in AP level courses. They are:

    1. Reads independently and readily recalls essential knowledge
    2. Organizes and synthesizes large amounts of material
    3. Writes organized, sophisticated essays

    DUAL ENROLLMENT
    The Dual Enrollment Program provides opportunities for RHS juniors and seniors to take college level courses and earn credit simultaneously toward high school completion and their future college degrees. The Dual Enrollment Program eases the transition from high school to college, allows students to get a head start on their college careers, and provides meaningful and challenging academic experiences to qualified students. 

    • Massasoit Community College Program: Randolph High School juniors and seniors who have shown to be capable of succeeding at college level work are eligible to take courses with Massasoit Community College on a space available basis. Students interested in registering for fall semester classes should discuss this option with their counselor and review the course of studies.
    • Quincy College Program: Randolph High School juniors and seniors may have the opportunity to earn college credit through Quincy College depending on independent RHS courses that have been aligned to QC standards. Students interested in registering for fall semester classes should discuss this option with their counselor and review the course of studies.

    NOTE
    Every year, the goal of RHS is to offer a wide variety of course offerings to meet the diverse interests of our students. That said, not every course in the Program of Studies is guaranteed to run in any given year. The decision to run a course includes a number of factors, including the total number of student requests for a particular course, the total number of teaching assignments available, and other factors that may impact the overall master schedule. Core classes for English, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, and World Language will always run so students can meet graduation requirements.

CAREER DEVELOPMENT

  • Career development courses offer students the opportunity to gain important career exposure and skills that they will be able to apply to any work environment. These courses include dual-enrollment with Massasoit Community College, Quincy College, or other career readiness classes.

    080552 First Responder Course 2.0 Credits Grades 11-12
    This two-part program is designed to foster interest in the emergency response field. Students will participate in programs that offer certification in the following areas: American Heart Association, First Aid, American Heart Association CPR and AED, American Heart Association Blood Borne pathogen, Massachusetts First Responder (includes EPI PEN and Narcan), National Incident Management System 100 and 700. In addition, there are also sessions for MOLST, psychological emergencies and hemorrhage control. In addition, the local Fire Department will provide education on fire ground operations and demonstrate equipment. The program will include simulation of emergency responses and will prepare the student to attend Emergency Medical Technician education and ultimately promote a career in emergency response.

    110042 Mass Communications I 0.50 Credits Grades 11-12
    This course is designed to provide students with an overview of the careers in the communications field.  Students will receive an introduction to mass communication mediums; newspaper, radio, television and the World Wide Web.  Students will design and edit projects for radio, television and newspaper.

    110512 Mass Communications II 0.50 Credits Grades 11-12
    Prerequisite: successful completion of Mass Communication I
    This course is a continuation of Mass Communication I with an in-depth approach to advertising, promotion, and production within the television and newspaper fields through hands-on skill building, camera operation, directing, and editing.

    229982 Senior Internship Project 1.0 Credits Grade 12 Term 4
    The Senior Internship Project provides seniors with the opportunity to experience work environments based on their interests and skills. Seniors in good standing can apply to participate and, with the help of our Career Coordinator, find an internship placement where they will work 30 hours a week during Term 4 of their senior year. Seniors must work towards and complete a final project that documents their experience and present their project to RHS juniors. During Term 4, seniors will not attend classes or take final exams. Seniors in AP classes will be responsible for attending their AP class(es) once a week and must take the AP exam(s) in May. All senior year grades and credits will be calculated based on Terms 1-3, with the final project as their final graduation requirement.

    120532 BUILD 1.0 Credits Grade 9/10 Elective
    BUILD is an entrepreneurship-based course that is designed under the pedagogy of experiential learning. Throughout the BUILD course, students are provided with the skills and the experience of creating unique, student-designed and student-run businesses in collaborative small groups. While entrepreneurship is the theme through which BUILD delivers the curriculum, the ultimate goal is for students to attain the transferrable, 21stcentury skills that are essential to helping them realize success in their small businesses, and in achieving their goals in college, career, and in their personal lives. BUILD calls these skills “Spark Skills”-Collaboration, Communication, Grit, Innovation, Problem Solving, and Self-Management. 

ENGLISH DEPARTMENT

  • The mission of the Randolph High School English Department is to prepare all students to successfully participate in a modern society in which great literature and literary traditions are valued and passed on, clear communication and successful collaboration are essential to the common good, and creative endeavors are wholeheartedly supported. We offer a program that strives to develop literate and literary citizens who can read and think critically and creatively, who can analyze literature and text, and who are able to write with power and clarity for various purposes. The English Department offers courses in language, literature, and composition for students of all ability levels. Course descriptions printed on the following pages outline course contents, levels and prerequisites. These descriptions serve as a guide to students as they make their choices for the four- year courses of studies in the academics of English. Elective English courses emphasize the development of written and oral communication skills as well as the appreciation of literature as an art form that affirms the importance of self-expression through courses of the student's own choosing. Students should select those courses most suited to their interests.

    Traditional Pathways: These are examples of the typical paths students take from 9th - 12th grade depending on their course level. Students may deviate from these pathways on an individual basis and as needed based on teacher recommendation and/or meeting course prerequisites.

     

    Course Pathways

    Grade 9

    Grade 10

    Grade 11

    Grade 12

    CP

    English I CP

    English II CP

    English III CP

    English IV CP

    Honors

    English I H

    English II H

    English III H

    English IV H

    AP

    English I H

    English II H

    English III H or
    AP Language or
    AP Literature

    AP Language or
    AP Literature

    Elective
    Options

    Creative Writing
    Public Speaking
    SAT Prep

    Creative Writing
    Public Speaking
    SAT Prep

    Creative Writing
    Public Speaking
    SAT Prep

    Creative Writing
    Public Speaking
    SAT Prep
    Storytelling/Podcast

     

    010012 English I (CP) 1.00 Credit Grade 9
    The English I curriculum emphasizes the study of communication through written, verbal, and technological expression. The CP curriculum emphasizes and enhances independence in reading and writing while working with the material at a deep and critical level with the goal of preparing students to advance their own communication skills as well as support the skills required of the MCAS exam in their Sophomore year. Students read, analyze, and respond to many literary works, such as  I’m Not Dying with you Tonight, Macbeth, and To Kill a Mockingbird, short stories, poetry, and non-fiction. Students develop and refine writing skills in the three modes of writing through the writing process and continue to improve their skills in class discussions, group work, and oral presentations.

    010011 English I (H) 1.00 Credit Grade 9
    Prerequisite: Grade of 90% or higher in 8th grade English class and teacher recommendation
    The English I Honors curriculum emphasizes the study of communication through written, verbal, and technological expression. The honors curriculum works in-depth with material; this depth along with a quick pace emphasizes and enhances independence in reading and writing with a focus on preparing students to continue on the track to AP studies in the future. Students read, analyze, and respond to many literary works, such as I’m Not Dying with you Tonight, Macbeth, and To Kill a Mockingbird, short stories, poetry and non-fiction. Students develop and refine their writing skills for informative, argumentative, and narrative texts through the writing process and continue to improve their skills in class discussions, group work, and oral presentations.

    010022 English II (CP) 1.00 Credit Grade 10
    Prerequisite: Successful completion of English I (CP)
    The English II curriculum focuses on four modes of writing: narrative, informative, literary analysis, and argumentative, as well as theme and author approach, to answer the essential question, "How do the choices we make impact our lives and our society?" The growth of a critical approach in the reader is encouraged through class discussion and outside reading. Some of the literature readings include but are not limited to: Fences, Antigone, Of Mice and Men. Students will refine their writing skill in order to respond to various, authentic writing prompts for specific audiences, as well as to develop sophistication in their ability to analyze, interpret, and appreciate literature. Writing activities include essays, research, critiques, and personal reflections. Students continue to develop critical thinking and class discussion skills. Vocabulary building is also stressed.

    010021 English II (H) 1.00 Credit Grade 10
    Prerequisite: Grade of 80% or higher in English I (H) or grade of 90% or higher in English I (CP)
    The English II Honors curriculum  focuses on four modes of writing: narrative, informative, literary analysis, and argumentative, as well as theme and author approach, to answer the essential question, "How do the choices we make impact our lives and our society?" The honors curriculum works in-depth with material; this depth, along with a quick pace emphasizes and enhances independence in reading and writing. The growth of a critical approach in the reader is encouraged through class discussion and outside reading. Some of the literature readings may include, but are not limited to: Everything I Never Told You, A Thousand Splendid Suns, Fences, Antigone, and Of Mice and Men. Students will refine their writing skill in order to respond to various, authentic writing prompts for specific audiences, as well as to develop sophistication in their ability to analyze, interpret, and appreciate literature.  Writing activities include essays, research, critiques, and personal reflections. Students continue to develop critical thinking and class discussion skills. Vocabulary building is also stressed.

    010032 English III (CP) 1.00 Credit Grade 11
    Prerequisite: Successful completion of English II (CP)
    The English Ill curriculum is a study of American Literature which focuses on four modes of writing: narrative, informative, literary analysis, and argumentative, as well as theme and author approach, to answer the essential question, "How do our experiences shape the American Identity?" Students read a variety of genres that reflect the American experience, including such works as Interpreter of Maladies,  A Streetcar Named Desire,  American Street, and selections from The Omnivore’s Dilemma. Students develop their writing skills by composing analytical essays, personal reflections, short written pieces and a full-length research paper. Classroom discussions, small group work, and presentations encourage students to become independent learners and thinkers and to  refine their speaking and listening skills.

    010031 English III (H) 1.00 Credit Grade 11
    Prerequisite: Grade of 80% or higher in English II (H) or grade of 90% or higher in English II (CP)
    The English III Honors curriculum is a study of American Literature which focuses on four modes of writing: narrative, informative, literary analysis, and argumentative, as well as theme and author approach, to answer the essential question,"How do our experiences shape the American Identity?" The honors curriculum works in depth with material; this depth along with a quick pace emphasizes and enhances independence in reading and writing. Students read a variety of genres that reflect the American experience, including such works as Interpreter of Maladies, The Great Gatsby, A Streetcar Named Desire, American Street, and selections from The Omnivore’s Dilemma. Students develop their writing skills by composing analytical essays, personal reflections, short written pieces, and a full-length research paper. Classroom discussions, small group work, and presentations encourage students to become independent learners and thinkers and to refine their speaking and listening skills.

    010042 English IV (CP) 1.00 Credit Grade 12
    Prerequisite: Successful completion of English III (CP)
    The English IV curriculum is a study of literature and nonfiction in which students examine the  texts through various perspectives for in-depth analysis and bias.  The curriculum emphasizes and enhances independence in reading and writing. Students read and study the works of classic and contemporary authors from many cultural perspectives and from many countries. Some of the readings include Gilgamesh, Canterbury Tales, Hamlet, Things Fall Apart, and Twelve Angry Men, as well as selections of non-fiction, poetry, and short stories. Students continue to develop their writing skills in order to respond to various authentic prompts for specific audiences, including their college application essay.Focused class discussions and a variety of oral presentations provide students with continued opportunities to refine their speaking and listening skills. Writing, reading and thinking skills are polished as students prepare for further schooling, training, and the workplace.

    010041 English IV (H) 1.00 Credit Grade 12
    Prerequisite: Grade of 80% or higher in English III (H) or grade of 90% or higher in English III (CP)
    The English IV Honors curriculum is a study of literature and nonfiction in which students examine the  texts through various perspectives for in-depth analysis and bias.  The honors curriculum emphasizes and enhances independence in reading and writing. Students read and study the works of classic and contemporary authors from many cultural perspectives. Some of the readings include Gilgamesh, The Glass Castle, Canterbury Tales, Hamlet, and Twelve Angry Men as well as selections of non-fiction, poetry, and short stories. Students continue to develop their writing skills in order to respond to various authentic prompts for specific audiences, including their college application essay. Focused class discussions and a variety of oral presentations provide students with continued opportunities to refine their speaking and listening skills. Writing, reading and thinking skills are polished as students prepare for further schooling, training, and the workplace.

    010055A AP English Language & Composition 1.00 Credit Grades 11-12
    Prerequisite: Grade of 80% or higher in Honors English or 90% or higher in College Prep English and teacher recommendation. Summer work is mandatory. Any student who does NOT take the AP exam at the conclusion of the course will receive HONORS not AP credit on their transcript. A fee is associated with the course.

    This course, taught at the college level, is a study of prose written in a variety of rhetorical contexts. The course emphasizes nonfiction writing through the study of expository, analytical, and researched argumentative writing, as well as personal and reflective writing about a variety of subjects. Students will read primary and secondary source materials in order to develop analytical reading skills. Students will become acquainted with a wide variety of prose styles from many historical periods, with an emphasis on persuasion and how the world around us impacts our thinking, communication, and identity. This is an intensive writing course. Everyday Use, Norton Reader, Elements of Argument.

    010065A AP English Literature & Composition 1.00 Credit Grades 11-12
    Prerequisite: Grade of 80% or higher in Honors English or 90% or higher in College Prep English and teacher recommendation. Any student who does NOT take the AP exam at the conclusion of the course will receive HONORS not AP credit on their transcript. A fee is associated with the course.

    This challenging course, taught at the college level, is a study of both classic and contemporary authors. Thematically based, the course examines the great questions that have challenged writers and thinkers over time, such as 11 What is love?", "What is justice?" and "How do we define and find freedom?". The course heavily emphasizes critical reading and thinking, literary analysis, and refined expository writing. Students are expected to actively engage in Socratic seminars. Readings will include: The Awakening, Importance of Being Earnest, Frankenstein, Heart of Darkness, , King Lear, Catcher in the Rye, The Things They Carried, and How to Read Literature Like a Professor.

    011041 Creative Writing I (CP) 0.50 Credit Grades 9-12
    This workshop-oriented elective engages students in a range of activities to discover their own voices in creative writing. Through class readings we will examine various writing styles and the successes and strategies that other writers use as students continue to develop a sense of diction, syntax, speaker, and audience. Students will use their creativity and skills to develop their own works in multiple genres, and present to their peers.

    011512 Public Speaking (CP) 0.50 Credit Grades 9-12
    Public Speaking is an interactive/performance-based course designed to increase proficiency in speech through practice in impromptu and extemporaneous speaking. Writing is also an important aspect of this course, as understanding and application of the writing process is necessary to create organized, effective speeches. Success in this course is dependent on students’ ability to integrate classroom material into effective, informative, and persuasive presentations.

    011045 Storytelling through Podcasting in the 21st Century (CP) 0.50 Credits Grades 11-12
    In this course, we explore how writing and storytelling has adapted in the 21st century through the popularity and accessibility of podcasting. This course will support ELA skills and 21st century learning and technology skills through the lens of argumentative, informative, literary, and narrative podcasts of various genres, such as popular culture, true crime, politics, sports, music, etc. Students will have the opportunity to develop strong listening, speaking, and writing skills through assigned and choice podcasts.

    012032 SAT Prep (CP) 0.50 Credit Grades 9-12
    This is a one semester course designed to focus on key writing and comprehension strategies that will lead students to successful scores on the SAT and comparable college entrance exams. Students will learn how to read and respond to complex texts quickly and accurately, as well as how to write effectively and precisely. Students will also focus on improving grammar and vocabulary skills to prepare for the rigor and expectation of the exam.

ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS

  • The RHS English Learners (EL) Department offers English as a Second Language classes. The English Learner's Program assists English Learners in linguistic and communicative competence in English and to perform in academic content classes. EL courses focus on developing and strengthening academic language in accordance with World Class Instructional Design Standards (WIDA) and the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks. These classes offer English Language Learners an equitable opportunity to access content knowledge by providing them with language strategies to progress in their academics while they are learning English.  All teachers in this department are licensed in English as a Second Language. The coursework for English Language Learners provides additional instruction in English Language Development focusing on building and refining vocabulary, pronunciation, fluency, grammar and comprehension so that students can become proficient listeners, speakers, readers and writers of English. These classes also facilitate a better understanding of expectations, procedures, regulations and guidelines for best behavior and participation in classes in the United States which may differ from the kind of educational experiences from a student's country of origin.

    010012 English I EL (CP) 1.00 Credit Grades 9-12
    The English I EL CP curriculum emphasizes the study of a variety of literary genres. The EL CP curriculum supports newcomer English Learners with modified materials, slower pace and direct instruction in Tier I, II and III vocabulary while working with the material at a deep and critical level. Students read, analyze, and respond to many literary works, such as Animal Farm, Night, Romeo and Juliet, short stories, poetry, and non-fiction. Students develop and refine writing skills through the writing process and continue to improve their skills in class discussions, group work, and oral presentations.

    030622 Biology EL (CP) 1.00 Credit Grades 9-12
    (ELD Level 1-2 students)
    Biology (EL) parallels the mainstream College Prep Biology curriculum, which is a life science course designed to investigate concepts developing analytical and reasoning skills. Students will conduct laboratory investigations to support the class discussions. Topics to be covered include molecular biology, cell structure and function, genetics, evolution, microbiology, and human body structure and function. Students must take the MCAS Biology test at the end of the course. With integrated language learning strategies, EL students will be able to improve their academic English in Biological science.

    010082 ESL Lab 1-2 (CP) 2.0 Credits Grades 9-12

    010081 ESL Lab 3 (CP) 1.0 Credit Grades 9-12

    010083 ESL Lab 4 (CP) 1.0 Credit Grades 9-12

MATHEMATICS

  • The RHS Mathematics Department offers a comprehensive four-year Mathematics program, whose mission is to enable every student to reach his or her math potential in a supportive, academically focused environment. In every mathematics course, we want students to develop a variety of math expertise as outlined by the Standards for Mathematical Practice in the 2017 Massachusetts Curriculum Framework for Mathematics. These standards complement the content standards so that students increasingly engage with the subject matter as they grow in mathematical maturity and expertise throughout the elementary, middle, and high school years.

    The use of mathematics in one or more forms is required in almost all occupations and in many everyday experiences. With this in mind, the mathematics program is designed to prepare students to pursue a career, further their education, and become well-informed, capable citizens. The successful completion of four years of mathematics is a graduation requirement.

    RHS Math Department Philosophy:

    All students will have access to a high-quality mathematics program that fosters problem solving, depth of understanding, and critical thinking through:

    • Curriculum that is standards-based, continuously updated, and connected to the real world
    • Instruction that is delivered by highly-qualified professionals, incorporates best practices, uses technology appropriately, and addresses differences in students' learning styles
    • Assessment that is ongoing, formative, and measures what is intended
    • Encouragement of students to both ask and answer questions, as well as explore their own interests as they connect to the content

     

    Traditional Pathways: These are examples of the typical paths students take from 9th - 12th grade depending on their course level. Students may deviate from these pathways on an individual basis and as needed based on teacher recommendation and/or meeting course prerequisites.  

    Course Pathways

    Grade 9

    Grade 10

    Grade 11

    Grade 12

    CP

    Algebra I CP

    Geometry CP

    Algebra II CP

    Stats/Personal Finance or Pre-Calculus CP

    Honors

    Algebra I H

    Geometry H

    Algebra II H

    Pre-Calculus H

    AP

    Geometry H

    Algebra II H  or H Alg II & Trig

    Pre-Calculus H

    AP AB Calculus or AP Statistics or AP BC Calculus

     

    02053 Algebra I (CP) 1.00 Credit Grade 9
    This course is the foundation for high school mathematics courses. It is the bridge from the concrete to the abstract study of mathematics. Topics include simplifying expressions, creating, evaluating and solving equations and inequalities.  The content covers linear, quadratic, exponential, and polynomial equations, as well as linear systems.  Students develop fluency writing, interpreting, and translating among various forms of linear equations. Students are also exposed to more abstract topics beginning with the study of functions and relations. Students will learn to model real world situations with specific restrictions various types of functions.

     

    020521 Algebra I (H) 1.00 Credit Grade 9
    Prerequisite: Department recommendation based on previous performance and readiness.
    This course is the foundation for high school mathematics courses. It is the bridge from the concrete to the abstract study of mathematics. Topics include simplifying expressions, creating, evaluating and solving equations and inequalities. Students will learn to model real world situations with specific restrictions using linear, exponential and quadratic functions. Students will also solve linear systems and quadratic equations using various methods. Real world applications are presented within the course content. Topics will be covered in greater depth than in Algebra I (CP).

    020722 Geometry (CP) 1.00 Credit Grades 9-10
    Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra I.
    This course is a study of geometric principles in two and three dimensions. Major units include lines, planes, space, polygons, congruence, transformations, similarity, circles, and three-dimensional figures.  There will be a significant focus on triangles, with basic trigonometry introduced.  Students will also prove geometric theorems and their converses, as well as construct geometric models, both by hand and using technology.  Geometric formulas and concepts should be used to model, set up, and solve problems.  There will also be a unit on probability.

    020721 Geometry (H) 1.00 Credit Grades 9-10
    Prerequisite: Grade of 85% or higher in Algebra I (H) or 90% or higher in Algebra I (CP).
    This is a fast-paced course that will cover all the topics in Geometry (CP).  Additional content includes exploration of more complex theorems, more complex trigonometric identities, and an introduction to conic sections. Topics will be covered in greater depth than in Geometry (CP).

    020561 Algebra II (CP) 1.00 Credit Grades 10-12
    Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra I and Geometry
    This course will focus on creating, reasoning, interpreting, modeling, and building various types of functions.  Among these will be quadratic, polynomial, trigonometric, exponential, logarithmic, and rational functions. Trigonometry will be introduced, examining the unit circle and periodicity, along with explorations of basic trigonometric identities.  Additional units include complex numbers, matrices, and basic vectors.  Graphing calculators will be used frequently.

    020562 Algebra II (H) 1.00 Credit Grades 10-11
    Prerequisite: Grade of 85% or higher in Algebra I (H) and Geometry (H) or grade of 90% or higher in Algebra I (CP) and Geometry (CP).
    This is a fast-paced, high level course that will cover all the content in Algebra II (CP).  There will be a greater focus on trigonometry and more complex proofs and identities, as well as operations on vectors.  This course will provide deeper investigations and applications than the CP course.  Graphing calculators will be used extensively.

    021061 Algebra II/Trigonometry (H) 1.00 Credit Grades 10-11
    Prerequisite: Grade of 85% or higher in Algebra I (H) and Geometry (H) or grade of 90% or higher in Algebra I (CP) and Geometry (CP).
    This is a fast-paced, high level course that will be very similar to Algebra II (H).  It will cover more trigonometry and will push students to investigate and explore concepts and related content both independently and collaboratively.  Graphing calculators will be used extensively.

    022012 Introduction to Statistics (CP) 0.50 Credit Grade 12
    Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra II.
    This course is an engaging and rigorous course that prepares students for a range of future options in non-mathematics intensive college majors or for entering work force training programs. It may also be an appealing elective for students pursuing pre-calculus and calculus. The goal of the course is to develop students as high-level consumers of data, enabling them to make intelligent choices when faced with difficult decisions in the real world.  Content includes units on central tendency and variance, probability, and appropriate statistical approaches to collecting and analyzing data.  With a focus on projects and class discussions, students will learn how to process and analyze data to draw conclusions and make predictions.

    029944 Math Proficiency Development (CP) 0.50 Credit Grades 9-12
    Prerequisite: Students for this course will be selected by assessment data and/or teacher recommendation.
    This course provides individualized and group preparation for the MCAS Math exam, along with content review and problem solving strategies.  It may be required for students who have not met the State mandated competency in this area. This course does not count towards the math requirement for graduation.

    222102 Mathematics and Personal Finance (CP) 0.50 Credit Grades 11-12
    Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra II
    This course examines the elements of living on your own in the “real world.” Students will be introduced to a variety of personal finance topics including career exploration, budgeting, banking and investing, credit, and major expenditures. This course will use Algebra and other math concepts to examine the many elements of managing money, living independently, and being a responsible consumer. In addition to independent and collaborative assignments, students will be required to participate in regular class discussions and will take part in real-world personal finance simulations.  Spreadsheet based technology will be incorporated into the curriculum frequently.

    021101 Pre-Calculus (CP) 1.00 Credit Grades 11-12
    Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra II
    This is a high level course designed for students interested in pursuing a career in either math or science.  Topics include operations with polynomial, exponential, rational, logarithmic and circular functions. Students will learn how to build, interpret, and analyze these functions and their inverses.  In addition, units on the complex number system, conic sections, matrices, polar coordinates, vectors, continuity and limits of functions will be covered.  Graphing calculators will be used frequently.

    021102 Pre-Calculus (H) 1.00 Credit Grade 11
    Prerequisite: Grade of 85% or higher in Algebra II (H) or Algebra II/Trigonometry (H) or grade of 90% or higher in Algebra II (CP)
    This is a fast paced, high level course designed for students interested in pursuing a career in either math or science.  Topics include operations with polynomial, exponential, rational, logarithmic and circular functions. Students will learn how to build, interpret, and analyze these functions and their inverses.  In addition, units on the complex number system, conic sections, matrices, polar coordinates, vectors, continuity and limits of functions will be covered.  Content will be more in depth than the CP level, and will also include exploration of circular functions and differentiation.  Graphing calculators will be used extensively.

    021245 Advanced Placement Calculus AB 1.00 Credits Grade 12
    Prerequisite: Grade of 85% or higher in Pre-Calculus (H) or 93% or higher in Pre-Calculus (CP)
    This course includes mandatory summer work.
    AP Calculus AB is a rigorous, full-year course that emphasizes critical thinking, application of content to real-word problems, and the use of technology. The course curriculum is defined by the College Board and is the equivalent of a one-semester college calculus course.  The course emphasizes a multi-representational approach to calculus, with concepts, results and problems being expressed graphically, numerically, analytically and verbally. Through the use of the unifying themes of derivatives, integrals, limits, approximation, and applications and modeling, the course becomes a cohesive whole rather than a collection of unrelated topics.

    This course will prepare students for the AB advanced placement test in calculus.  Graphing calculators will be required for this course (TI-84 strongly recommended).

    Note: Students who enroll in AP Calculus AB are required to take the AP exam in order to earn credit for the course. There is a fee for taking this exam, which may be reduced by the district, pending funding.

    021255 Advanced Placement Calculus BC 1.00 Credits Grade 12
    Prerequisite: Grade of 85% or higher in Pre-Calculus (H) or 93% or higher in Pre-Calculus (CP).
    This course includes mandatory summer work.
    AB Calculus BC is a rigorous, full-year course with a curriculum defined by the College Board and is equivalent of a full year of college calculus.  This course will cover use similar approaches to AP Calculus AB and cover all of the same content. Major units beyond AB calculus include advanced techniques of integration, vectors, parametric equations, polar equations, polynomial approximations and infinite series.  Graphing calculators will be required for this course (TI-84 strongly recommended).

    Note: Students who enroll in AP Calculus BC are required to take the AP exam in order to earn credit for the course. There is a fee for taking this exam, which may be reduced by the district, pending funding.

    022035 Advanced Placement Statistics 1.00 Credit Grades 10-12
    Prerequisite: Grade of 85% or higher in Geometry (H) or 93% or higher in Algebra I (CP) or Geometry (CP).
    This course includes mandatory summer work.
    AP Statistics is a rigorous, full-year course that emphasizes critical thinking, written communication skills, and the use of technology. The course curriculum is defined by College Board and is the equivalent of a one-semester, introductory college statistics course. Major units include exploratory data analysis, sampling and experimental design, probability, and inference. Students are expected to have excellent reading and writing skills as well as a strong work ethic. (All students are required to own a Tl-83 or Tl-84 graphing calculator.)

    Note: Students who enroll in AP Statistics are required to take the AP exam in order to earn credit for the course. There is a fee for taking this exam, which may be reduced by the district, pending funding

    029933 SAT Prep - Math (CP) 0.50 Credit Grades 11-12
    This course is a study of the problems students will encounter on SAT Math tests. It is recommended that students take this course either 2nd semester junior year or 1" semester senior year. This course will also prepare students for the Accuplacer test. An investigation of advanced mathematical topics will also be included in the course. This course does not count towards the math requirement for graduation.

PERFORMING ARTS

  • The RHS Performing Arts Department offerings are for students' enrichment of aesthetic values and the development of basic skills in music through the study of history, theory, instrumental and vocal techniques and performance.  They further the development of advanced skills for the gifted students and for students preparing for a career in music.  Students participating in the music program, will continuously engage in the following activities according to the National Standards of Music Education:

    • A varied repertoire of music will be sung alone and with others
    • A varied repertoire of music performing on instruments, alone and with others
    • Improving melodies, variations, and accompaniments
    • Composing and arranging music within specified guidelines
    • Reading and notating music
    • Listening to, analyzing and describing music
    • Evaluating music and performances
    • Understanding relationships between music, the other arts, and disciplines outside the arts
    • Understanding music in relation to history and culture

    051014 Band: Winds (CP) 1.50 Credit Grades 9-12
    Prerequisite: Prior instrumental experience or approval of Band Director
    Band class is a performance class for students with instrumental experience who desire to become proficient on a brass or woodwind instrument. Instruction will include instrumental technique, music reading and interpretation, music theory as well as performance skills. Students will study and perform the finest contemporary and traditional literature written for the wind band. Components of this course include concert band, marching band and chamber music ensembles. In addition to a very exciting performance schedule, the band also attends music festivals, concerts and regularly works with clinicians. Student progress will be evaluated by means of recorded playing performances and written assessments. Detailed assessment policies may be found in the Band Handbook provided by the Band Director.

    Note: As a member of the RHS Band, students are required to perform with the band at evening and weekend concerts, halftime shows of football games, and attend after school rehearsals as needed to meet the band's performance objectives.

    051015 Band: Winds (H) 1.50 Credits Grades 10-12
    Prerequisite: Grade of 80% or higher in Band (H) or 90% or higher in Band (CP)
    Band class is a performance class for students with instrumental experience who desire to become proficient on a brass or woodwind instrument. Instruction will include instrumental technique, music reading and interpretation, intermediate music theory as well as performance skills. Students will study and perform the finest contemporary and traditional literature written for wind band. Components of this course include concert band, marching band and chamber music ensembles. In addition to a very exciting performance schedule, the band also attends music festivals, concerts, and regularly works with clinicians.

    Student progress will be evaluated by means of recorded playing performances and written assessments. Detailed assessment policies may be found in the Band Handbook provided by the Band Director.

    Note: As a member of the RHS Honors Band, students are required to perform with the band at evening and weekend concerts, half time shows of football games, attend after school rehearsals as needed to meet the band's performance objectives, audition for SEMMEA District Festival and perform in an extra-curricular ensemble (Jazz Band, Community Band, etc). In addition, students must complete two from the following list):

    1. Give group/private lessons to band students at RCMS and/or elementary schools at least twice per month
    2. Participate in at least 5 community performances per school year
    3. Serve in a leadership role for the RHS Band (section leader, librarian, etc.)
    4. Receive private lessons

    051121 Chamber Singers (H) 1.00 Credit Grades 9-12
    Prerequisites: Enrollment in this class by audition. Grade of 90% or higher in chorus.
    This class is for all students who wish to expand their choral singing skills. Students will receive instruction ins breathing technique, diction, sight-reading, and vocal production as well as performance skills. A wide variety of choral literature will be performed. Students will work to teach lessons at RPS elementary schools twice a month and have the opportunity for private lessons. Students will audition for either the District Festival or SEMSBA Festival. Students will have the opportunity to work with clinicians and other members of the community.

    Note: As a member of the RHS Chamber Singers, students are required to perform with the group at evening and weekend concerts, and attend after school rehearsals as needed to meet the choir's performance objectives. Concert performance schedules are given out at the beginning of the year, however, students should expect to perform in 3-5 events in addition to the concerts.

    051112 Concert Chorale (CP) 1.00 Credit Grades 9-12
    This is a class for aspiring choral singers who wish to explore vocal and choral technique as demonstrated in a large ensemble. Students will perform a varied repertoire of literature spanning several centuries and styles. Students will audition for either the District Festival of the SEMSBA Festival, and will have the opportunity to work with clinicians and other members of the community.

    Note: As a member of the RHS Concert Chorale, students are required to perform with the group at evening and weekend concerts and attend after school rehearsals as needed to meet the choir's performance objectives.

    051491 Music Technology I (CP) 0.50 Credit Grades 9-12
    Prerequisite: Students should possess a strong desire to compose and create music. Students must provide their own headphones for class.
    This course will provide students with hands-on experience of a variety of music technologies. Course topics will include musical composition, audio editing, music critique, website design and technology research. Students will explore the effect music technology has on our world and how technology has affects music in our lives. Students will learn basic terms associated with music editing and will also study basic music theory topics. Student progress will be evaluated by means of written assessments and in class performance presentations.

    051141 Music Theory (H) 1.0 Credit Grades 9-12
    Prerequisite: Successful completion and teacher recommendation in previous music related course.
    Music Theory is a class for students who are interested in developing their advanced visual and aural understanding of the structure of music. Students will study the advanced language of music, learn compositional techniques and the rules associated with composing, study the various types of form in music, and study basic ear-training to be able to recognize the above elements aurally. Students will be evaluated based on written and performance assessments.

    051081 Piano I 0.50 Credit Grades 9-12
    This course is for students having little or no experience with the piano keyboard. Students will learn to play simple pieces of music, reading standard music notation and using proper piano technique. Major piano compositions and internationally renowned pianists will also be explored during the class. Student progress will be evaluated by means of written assessment and individual in-class piano performance. Students will complete their final exam for the course through a class recital.

    051016 Band: Percussion (CP) 1.50 Credits Grades 9-12
    Prerequisite: Prior instrumental experience and/or approval of Band Director
    Percussion class is a performance class for students who desire to become proficient on a percussion instrument. Instruction will include specific instrumental technique, music reading and interpretation, basic music theory as well as performance skills. Students will study and perform the finest contemporary and traditional literature written for wind band. Components of this course include concert band, marching band and chamber music ensembles. In addition to a very exciting performance schedule, the band also attends music festivals, concerts, and regularly works with clinicians. Student progress will be evaluated by means of recorded playing performances and written assessments.

    Note: As a member of the RHS Percussion class, students are required to perform with the band at evening and weekend concerts, half time shows of football games, and attend after school rehearsals as needed to meet the band's performance objectives.

    051017 Band: Percussion (H) 1.50 Credits Grades 9-12
    Prerequisite: Grade of 80% or higher in Percussion (H) or grade of 90% or higher in Percussion (CP)
    Percussion class is a performance class for students who desire to become proficient on a percussion instrument. Instruction will include advanced, specific instrumental technique, advanced music reading and interpretation, basic music theory as well as performance skills. Students will study and perform the finest contemporary and traditional literature written for wind band. Components of this course include concert band, marching band and chamber music ensembles. In addition to a very exciting performance schedule, the band also attends music festivals, concerts, and regularly works with clinicians. Student progress will be evaluated by means of recorded playing performances and written assessments.

    Note: As a member of the RHS Honors Percussion class, students are required to perform with the band at evening and weekend concerts, half-time shows of football games, attend after school rehearsals as needed to meet the band's performance objectives, audition for SEMMEA District Festival, perform at one or more RHS Student Artist Recitals and participate in a Chamber Group (10 members or less) that rehearses at least three times per month.

    In addition, students must complete two from the following list:

    1. Give group/private lessons to band students at RCMS and/or elementary schools at least twice per month
    2. Participate in at least 5 community performances per school year
    3. Serve in a leadership role for the RHS Band (section leader, librarian, etc. 4. Pri Les

    051122 Theater and Broadway (CP) 1.0 Credits Grades 9–12
    Theater and Broadway is an elective music course where the primary objective is to expose students to the rich history, heritage and evolution of the American Musical Comedy leading to a vast knowledge of New York’s theatrical history from Vaudeville through modern day integrated musicals through the use of audio and visual media. Students will also develop an understanding of the production aspects of the theater world from the points of view of directors, producers and behind-the-scenes technicians.  Students will also be required as part of this course to contribute to the Spring Musical Production whether it be during class time or as an extra-curricular participant. In class performances and presentations are expected. No instrumental or choral experience required.

    051123 Vocal Techniques (CP) 0.50 Credits Grades 9–12
    This class is designed to provide students with the fundamental techniques of singing and performing. Music of all styles will be studied. Students will expand their individual abilities with both solo and class ensemble performances. Students will also develop skills necessary to become an independent musician. The class will be differentiated to meet student needs. No previous singing experience is required but the student must be willing to sing out loud in front of the class in order to progress in the course.

    051124 Ukulele (CP) 0.50 Credits Grades 9–12
    This course is for students having little or no experience with ukulele.. Students will learn to play chords,  simple pieces of music, reading standard music notation and tablature, strumming patterns and  using proper ukulele technique. Major piano compositions and internationally renowned pianists will also be explored during the class. Student progress will be evaluated by means of written assessment and individual in-class piano performance. Students will complete their final exam for the course through a class recital.

SCIENCE/TECHNOLOGY

  • The mission of the RHS Science and Technology Department is to prepare all students to constructively participate in a modern society in which science and engineering influence nearly every aspect of their lives. We offer a program that strives to develop scientifically literate citizens who possess an understanding of the nature of science and who have the knowledge base necessary to critically analyze scientific claims and assertions. By experiencing a relevant and rigorous science curriculum and developing their knowledge of the engineering design process, Randolph High students will be well-positioned to pursue advanced studies in science and engineering and careers in scientific and engineering fields if they choose.

    The Science and Technology Department offers lab-based courses designed to challenge students. Using a variety of strategies students will continue to build on problem solving skills while gaining an understanding of the process and content of both the biological and physical sciences.

    Traditional Pathways: These are examples of the typical paths students take from 9th - 12th grade depending on their course level. Students may deviate from these pathways on an individual basis and as needed based on teacher recommendation and/or meeting course prerequisites.

     

    Course Pathways

    Grade 9

    Grade 10

    Grade 11

    Grade 12

    CP

    Biology CP

    Physics CP

    Chemistry CP or Electives

    Electives*

    Honors

    Biology H

    Chemistry H

    Physics H or Electives

    AP or Electives*

    AP

    Biology H

    Chemistry H

    AP Biology

    AP Physics

    Electives

     

    PLTW CSE

    Exploring Bioethics
    Environmental Sci
    Anatomy & Phys
    Forensic Science
    Astronomy
    PLTW CSE
    PLTW Cybersecurity

    Exploring Bioethics
    Environmental Sci
    Anatomy & Phys
    Forensic Science
    Astronomy
    PLTW CSE
    PLTW Cybersecurity
    PLTW CSP

     

    030622 Biology (CP) 1.00 Credit Grades 9-12
    College Prep Biology is a life science course designed to investigate concepts developing analytical and reasoning skills. Students will conduct laboratory investigations to support the class discussions. Topics to be covered include molecular biology, cell structure and function, genetics, evolution, microbiology, and human body structure and function. Students must take the MCAS Biology test at the end of the course

    030621 Biology (H) 1.00 Credit Grades 9-12
    Prerequisite: Grade of 85% or higher in 8th grade Science class.
    Honors Biology is a life science course with a focus on reasoning, application and conceptualization. Students will conduct laboratory investigations that reinforce analytical and reasoning skills as well supporting class discussions. Topics to be covered include molecular biology, cell structure and function, genetics, evolution, microbiology, and human body structure and function. Students must take the MCAS Biology test at the end of the course.

    031012 Chemistry (CP) 1.00 Credit Grades 10-12
    Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra I
    A college preparatory course designed to investigate concepts using analytical and critical thinking skills. This course will cover topics in the structure of matter, chemical dynamics, chemical bonding, reactions, stoichiometry and the mole concept. Conceptual understanding is emphasized, and many concepts are represented through mathematical modeling. Skills in measurement techniques, unit knowledge and manipulation, data collection and hypothesis building will be emphasized. Laboratory investigations will reinforce analytical skills and support the lecture/class discussions. Concepts are introduced through a variety of methods and the use of technology is woven throughout the course.

    030011 Chemistry (H) 1.00 Credit Grades 10-12
    Prerequisite: Grade of 80% or higher in Biology (H) (CP) and Algebra I (H) or grade of 90% or higher in Algebra I (CP)
    A fast-paced course designed to meet the needs of students pursuing careers in science. This course will cover topics in the structure of matter, chemical dynamics, chemical bonding, reactions, stoichiometry and the mole concept. Mathematical modeling, mathematical analysis, problem solving, analytical laboratory techniques and critical thinking are all emphasized. Students will conduct laboratory investigations that reinforce analytical skills and support the lecture/class discussions. Concepts are introduced through a variety of methods and the use of technology is woven throughout the course

    031612 Physics (CP) 1.00 Credit Grades 10-12
    Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra I
    A fast-paced course designed to provide a hands-on approach to learning physics. The course covers topics in force and motion, conservation of energy and momentum, heat and heat transfer, waves, electromagnetism and electromagnetic radiation. There is a focus on developing problem-solving skills

    031611 Physics (H) 1.00 Credit Grades 10-12
    Prerequisite: Grade of 80% or higher in Algebra 1 (H) & Geometry (H) or grade of 90% or higher in Algebra I (CP) & Geometry (CP).
    A fast paced, high-level course designed to meet the needs of students pursuing a career in science. The course covers topics in mechanics, thermodynamics, waves, electricity and magnetism. Two-dimensional mathematical analysis and high-level problem-solving techniques are emphasized. Concepts are introduced through hands-on activities and technology is woven throughout the course.

    030631 Exploring Bioethics Course (H) 0.50 Credit Grades 11-12
    Prerequisite: Successful completion of Biology and Chemistry
    This course gives students an opportunity to grapple with some of the most challenging and engaging ethical issues our society is facing as a consequence of advances in the life sciences. Students will use real-life cases to introduce a core set of ethical considerations that are important for analyzing ethical issues in medicine and the life sciences. Activities in the course will promote active and collaborative learning to help students develop their ethical-reasoning and critical-thinking skills. Many of the questions considered are practical issues that students are likely to face in their lives. A major goal of this course Is to enable students to become more responsible and thoughtful decision makers in a world of ever-increasing complexity.

    030032 Environmental Science (CP) 1.00 Credit Grades 11-12
    Prerequisite: Successful completion of Biology and Chemistry
    An interdisciplinary course designed to study inter-relationships, human interactions and impact on natural environments. Students will study concepts in earth science as they relate to the environment and provide suggestions for resolving and preventing problems. Students will engage in individual research, laboratory investigations and field work.

    030552 Physiology (CP) 1.00 Credit Grades 11-12
    Prerequisite: Grade of 80% or higher in Biology AND grade of 70% or higher in Chemistry
    Human Anatomy & Physiology is a course designed to study the structure and function of the human body. Cells, tissues, and organs of the human body will be emphasized. Students will engage in dissections, conduct experiments and research on selected topics. The course is highly recommended for students interested in studying life sciences or are considering a career as a doctor, nurse, pharmacist, physical or occupational therapist or other health related profession.

    150532 Forensic Science 0.50 Credit Grades 11-12
    Prerequisite: Successful completion of at least two full-year science courses
    A half- year course designed to introduce the basic application of science to the law. Scientists are often involved in the search for and examination of physical and or chemical traces which can be used to establish or exclude a suspect's association with a crime. Topics include criminal investigations, fingerprinting and DNA analysis with a focus on hands-on activities and an emphasis on data collection combined with reinforcing analytical skills, processing and logical thinking.

    030042 Astronomy (CP) 0.50 Credit Grades 11-12
    A half-year course designed to highlight the historical development of the solar system. Drawing upon recent data from space probes and the Hubble telescope, students will investigate the structure of the sun, the planets and their moons, and solar system debris including comets and asteroids. The birth and death of stars, structure and evolution of the galaxies, pulsars, white dwarfs, black holes and quasars will be discussed while current theories in cosmology will be explored.

    101582 PLTW Computer Science Essentials (CP) 1.0 Credit 10-12
    In Computer Science Essentials, students begin by using visual, block-based programming to build their computational thinking skills. Then, students start coding with text-based programming languages such as Python, create apps, and develop websites just like a professional developer. Students continue to work with classmates like a team of developers, participating in a “scrum” to develop an app, computing device, or text-based code that solves a problem they or their community are facing.

    109992 PLTW Cybersecurity (CP) 1.00 Credit Grades 11-12
    Students in Cybersecurity apply their knowledge of coding and computational thinking to seek out vulnerabilities in data storage systems and online commerce sites, then design solutions to increase safety and protection. Whether seeking a career in the growing field of cybersecurity or learning to defend their own personal data or a company’s data, students in Cybersecurity establish an ethical code of conduct while proactively defending data in today’s complex cyberworld.

    101572 PLTW Computer Science Principles (CP) 1.00 Credit Grade 12
    In Computer Science Principles, students solve digital challenges by developing the computational thinking and technical skills of leading computer scientists. Learning by doing, students:

    • Become fluent in Python, professionals’ primary computational language
    • Debug code to ensure programs act as intended and are useful to the user
    • Create an engaging computer game
    • Code and decode data to keep it safe on the internet
    • Make sense of large quantities of data by creating data visualizations

    The PLTW Computer Science Principles course is aligned to the AP Curriculum Framework and PLTW is recognized by the College Board as an endorsed provider.

    030565 Advanced Placement Biology 1.00 Credits Grades 11-12
    Prerequisite: Grade of 80% or higher in Biology (H) & Chemistry, or 90% or higher in Biology (CP) & Chemistry. Mandatory summer work. Any student who does NOT take the AP exam at the conclusion of the course will receive HONORS not AP credit on their transcript. A fee is associated with the course.
    A course equivalent to a college level introductory Biology course designed for students with a strong interest in the sciences and careers in biomedical research, medicine, biotechnology and other related professions. The course focuses on major ideas including evolution as it relates to diversity and unity of life, biological systems and the common characteristics of life and the complex mechanisms of interactions. A college text is used, and students are expected to put a considerable amount of time and effort in preparation for the required spring AP exam.

    030035 Advanced Placement Environmental Science 1.00 Credits Grades 11-12
    Prerequisites: Grade of 80% or higher in Biology (H) and Chemistry (H), or 90% or higher in Biology (CP) & Chemistry. Mandatory summer work. Any student who does NOT take the AP exam at the conclusion of the course will receive HONORS not AP credit on their transcript. A fee is associated with the course.
    A full year course equivalent to a college level course designed to study inter-relationships, human interactions and impact on natural environments. Students will identify and analyze environmental problems and provide suggestions for resolving and preventing problems. A college text is used, and students are expected to put a considerable amount of time and effort in preparation for the required spring AP exam.

    031615 Advanced Placement Physics I 1.00 Credits Grades 11-12
    Prerequisite: Grade of 80% or higher in Algebra 1 (H) & Geometry (H) or grade of 90% or higher in Algebra I (CP) & Geometry (CP). Mandatory summer work. Any student who does NOT take the AP exam at the conclusion of the course will receive HONORS not AP credit on their transcript. A fee is associated with the course.
    This course is the equivalent of a first-semester college course in algebra-based physics designed for students with a strong interest in physics or engineering. The course provides students the opportunity to develop a deep understanding of the content and to focus on applying their knowledge through inquiry labs. The course covers Newtonian mechanics (including rotational dynamics and angular momentum); work, energy and power; and mechanical waves and sound. It also introduces electrical circuits. A college text is used, and students are expected to put in a considerable amount of time and effort in preparation for the required spring AP exam.

SOCIAL STUDIES

  • The mission of the RHS Social Studies Department is to prepare students to be critical thinkers, effective communicators, active and aware participants in American society, and engaged citizens of a global community. We offer a program of studies that exposes students to both historical and current topics within the United States, as well as around the world. Students are asked to examine both primary and secondary sources, and to use evidence to substantiate claims made in writing, dialogue, debate, and presentation. The department challenges students to write and speak effectively with clarity and purpose and to advocate for positive change through active participation in the democratic process.

    The Social Studies Department strives to develop student understanding of how the past impacts both the present and the future. We encourage the development of an appreciation and respect for history and the other social sciences. Through the variety of courses in our department, students learn how to use the lenses from these disciplines to understand and analyze the growing interconnectedness of our world. We aim to develop students' sense of civic engagement while promoting a sense of global awareness. Through our curriculum and instruction, students engage in rich and rigorous learning opportunities that develop content knowledge, creative and independent thinking, critical reading, and writing skills, problem-solving strategies, effective communication skills, civic engagement, and global competency.

    Traditional Pathways: These are examples of the typical paths students take from 9th - 12th grade depending on their course level. Students may deviate from these pathways on an individual basis and as needed based on teacher recommendation and/or meeting course prerequisites.

     

    Course Pathways

    Grade 9

    Grade 10

    Grade 11

    Grade 12

    CP

    Early US CP

    Modern US CP

    Modern World CP

    Electives*

    Honors

    Early US H

    Modern US H

    Modern World H

    Electives*

    AP

    Early US H

    Modern US H

    AP US History or
    Modern World History

    Modern World History or
    AP US History or
    AP Psychology

    Electives

    Psychology

    Psychology, Peer Leadership I

    US Government or
    Peer Leadership I, Peer leadership II

    US Government
    Peer leadership II


    041022 Early U.S. History American Revolution-1920 (CP) 1.00 Credit Grade 9
    The ninth grade United States curriculum is the first year of a two-year course. This course focuses on the build up to and causes of the American Revolution; the significance of the American Revolution as a political movement in the US; the development of the US Constitution; the expansion of the United States from an east coast to an emerging continental power during the 19th century; the geographic; economic; political and social factors which led to the Civil War and the abolition of slavery, study of Reconstruction and the impact that Reconstruction, and the years following Reconstruction, has had on US History. The course will close with a study of the First World War.

    041021 Early U.S. History American Revolution-1920 (H) 1.00 Credit Grade 9
    Prerequisite: Grade of 85% or better in 8th grade Social Studies class and teacher recommendation.
    The ninth grade United States curriculum is the first year of a two-year course. US I focuses on the build up to and causes of the American Revolution; the significance of the American Revolution as a political movement in the US; the development of the US Constitution; the expansion of the United States from an east coast to an emerging continental power during the 19th century; the geographic, economic, political, and social factors which led to the Civil War and the abolition of slavery, study of Reconstruction and the impact that Reconstruction, and the years following Reconstruction, has had on US History. The course will close with a study of the First World War. Honors students will be expected to engage in making abstract connections among a variety of historical concepts, interpret higher level texts, read supplementary material, critically discuss larger global impacts of historical events and figures, as well as generate critical questions about United States and world events.

    041032 Modern U.S. History 1920-Present (CP) 1.00 Credit Grade 10
    Prerequisite:  Passing grade in Early U.S. History
    The focus of US II is the emergence of the United States as a world power. Among the themes and topics are: the disappearance of the frontier and its impact on the American psyche; the shift from an agricultural to an urban and suburban culture; the evolving definition of what it means to be an American; the struggle for civil rights for all minorities; the rise of the United States as an economic, social, cultural, political, and leading world power; and major domestic and global conflicts. Implicit in these themes are the different roles the United States government has played in both domestic and foreign affairs, as well as the role(s) the American citizen plays in a democracy.

    041031 Modern U.S. History 1920-Present (H) 1.00 Credit Grade 10
    Prerequisite: Grade of 80% or higher in Early U.S. History (H) or grade 90% or higher in Early U.S. History (CP).
    The focus of US II is the emergence of the United States as a world power. Among the themes and topics are: the disappearance of the frontier and its impact on the American psyche; the shift from an agricultural to an urban and suburban culture; the evolving definition of what it means to be an American; the struggle for civil rights for all minorities; the rise of the United States as an economic, social, cultural, political, and leading world power; and the vast range of major domestic and global conflicts from 1865 to the present. Covered within these concepts are the different roles the United States government has played in domestic and foreign affairs and the roles(s) the American citizen plays in a democracy and global affairs. Honors students will be expected to engage in making abstract connections among a variety of historical concepts, interpret higher /eve/ texts, read supplementary material, critically discuss larger global impacts of historical events and figures, as well as generate critical questions about United States and world events.

    040532 Modern World History 1700-Present (CP) 1.00 Credit Grades 11-12
    Prerequisite: Passing grade in Modern U.S. History
    This course critically examines important world events that took place from the 19th to the 21st century. The course will survey major events such as the Enlightenment, Industrial Revolution, Age of Imperialism, World Wars, Nationalism, Post WWII global conflicts, global revolutions, governmental systems, and the social, political, and cultural events that have shaped, and continue to shape, the contemporary world. Students will examine global events through the lenses of political science, economics, geography, and sociology.

    040531 Modern World History 1700-Present (H) 1.00 Credit Grades 11-12
    Prerequisite: Grade of 80% or higher in Modern U.S. History (H) or grade of 90% or higher in Modern U.S. History (CP) or grade of 80% or higher in APUSH.
    This course critically examines important world events that took place from the 19th to the 21st century. The course will survey major events such as the Enlightenment, Industrial Revolution, Age of Imperialism, World Wars, Nationalism, Post WWII global conflicts, global revolutions, governmental systems, and the social, political, and cultural events that have shaped, and continue to shape, the contemporary world. Students will examine global events through the lenses of political science, economics, geography, and sociology. Honors students will be expected to engage in making abstract connections among a variety of historical concepts, interpret higher-level texts, read supplementary material, critically discuss larger global impacts of historical events and figures, as well as generate critical questions about world events.

    042565 Advanced Placement Psychology 1.00 Credit Grades 11-12
    Prerequisite: Grade of 80% or higher in most recent honors-level history course or grade of 90% or higher in most recent CP-level history course + written teacher recommendation. It is strongly recommended that students complete a Statistics course before taking AP Psychology. Any student who does NOT take the AP exam at the conclusion of the course will receive HONORS not AP credit on their transcript. A fee is associated with the course.Following the College Board’s suggested curriculum designed to parallel a college-level psychology course, AP Psychology courses introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals, expose students to each major subfield within psychology, and enable students to examine the methods that psychologists use in their science and practice.

    041045 Advanced Placement U.S History 1.00 Credit Grades 10-12.
    Prerequisite: Grade of 85% or higher in Early U.S. History (H), 80% or higher in Modern U.S. History, or grade of 90% or higher in Early or Modern U.S. History (CP). Students may also take this course after taking both Early and Modern U.S. History. Any student who does NOT take the AP exam at the conclusion of the course will receive HONORS not AP credit on their transcript. A fee is associated with the course. Note: If taken in 10th grade, course will satisfy US II requirement. Following the College Board’s suggested curriculum designed to parallel college-level U.S. History courses, AP U.S. History courses provide students with the analytical skills and factual knowledge necessary to address critical problems and materials in U.S. history. Students learn to assess historical materials and to weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarship. The course examines the discovery and settlement of the New World through the recent past.

    042542 Psychology 0.50 Credit Grades 9-10
    This Psychology course introduces students to the study of individual human behavior, using scientific principles to answer questions about the human condition. Course content may include (but is not limited to) an overview of the field of psychology, topics in human growth and development, sensation and perception, personality and behavior, motivation, emotion, and stress and abnormal psychology. This course includes a focus on mindfulness, positive psychology, and using psychological skills to build healthy habits.

    04151 U.S. Government & Politics 0.50 Credit Grades 11-12
    This course provides an overview of the structure and functions of the U.S. government and political institutions and examines constitutional principles, the concept of  rights and responsibilities, the role of political parties and interest groups, and the importance of civic participation in the democratic process. This course may examine the structure and function of state and local governments and may cover certain economic and legal topics depending on student interest.

    221012 Peer Leadership & Social Justice I 1.00 Credit Grades 10 and 11
    Prerequisite: Application to program including review from a panel of RHS community members and written recommendation from teacher.
    This course will help you come to powerful realizations about yourself and others, while learning to better appreciate diversity and the challenges we all face as people. Furthermore, Peer Leadership will prepare you not only to identify social justice issues in our society today, but also to become an upstander—someone who is willing and able to make a difference. In order to train you as a peer leader, you will build a strong understanding of topics including (but not limited to) teambuilding, social justice in schools and the community, and teaching and pedagogy. This course is a two year commitment. Students in this course will focus on learning as juniors and teaching as seniors.

    221013 Peer Leadership & Social Justice II 0.50 Credit Grades 11 and 12
    Prerequisite: Successful completion of Peer Leadership and Social Justice I
    This course is a continuation of Peer Leadership and Social Justice I. Peer Leaders will deliver their developed lessons to the incoming Freshmen class throughout semester I.  Furthermore, Peer Leadership will be partnered up with incoming freshmen as mentors to support their transition to high school. This course has some after-school requirements and is 1 semester in length.

SPECIAL EDUCATION

  • The Special Education Department offers a wide range of courses to meet the needs of all students who are eligible for special education related services and who are identified as at-risk. These courses are provided with supports embedded in the programs described below: 

    1. Inclusion
    2. Language-Based
    3. ILC (formally Pre-Vocational)
    4. Transition (Post-Graduate)

    Inclusion: Inclusion classes level the playing field for students with disabilities in mainstream classrooms, particularly in ELA and Mathematics, with the provision of specialized design instruction including differentiation, accommodations, and the support of a special education teacher within the context of the core curriculum and general class activities. Students needing special education support in inclusion are scheduled in general education classes in English and Mathematics with a certified Special Education teacher.

    Language-Based: Language-based classes provide highly structured small group instruction to students Grades 9-12 with language-based disabilities in ELA and Math. A certified Speech and Language Pathologist should provide direct therapeutic services and provide consultation to the classroom teacher on how to present the information in a language-based manner. Language-based content courses include English (all levels), Mathematics (all levels), Science (Biology only), and World Language (Spanish I only).

    Individualized Learning Community (ILC) - Formally Pre-Vocational: The ILC is a program of substantially separate classrooms at Randolph High School for grades 9 through age 22. The program meets the needs of students who require significant specialized instruction in academics. The program provides embedded opportunities to practice functional communication, self-help, and social-emotional skills. This program primarily serves students with a primary disability category of Intellectual Impairment or Autism who require targeted instruction tailored to their unique needs using a developmentally appropriate, multi-sensory approach.

    Students in the program require substantial curriculum modifications and/or supplemental and alternative curricula and are generally working on standards at the “access skills” or “entry point” levels. Students also participate in activities of daily living (ADLs) with ongoing instruction in self-help skills, community access, transition skills, and functional communication skills embedded into the classroom throughout the day to help students gain independence.

    Students who demonstrate higher level skills are also encouraged to participate in classes outside of the program to offer the least restrictive environment. Some students may take classes in the LB program and/or Randolph High School's inclusion classes based on the individual's strengths. We do offer a track to receiving an MCAS certified high school diploma for students who can successfully pass the MCAS. 

    Students in the ILC Program typically remain with the program until they are 22 years old. After 12th grade, students can continue working on activities of daily living (ADLs) with ongoing instruction in self-help skills, community access, transition skills, and functional communication skills in our Transitions Program. The program also supports families with the transition from Randolph Public Schools to adult service agencies, primarily Department of Developmental Services. 

    The goal of the Transition Program is to help students become as independent as possible, including securing competitive integrated employment. Students learn a variety of life skills such as being able to access public transportation, budget earnings, make purchases, behave appropriately in community and work based settings, follow directions. As they make progress, students fine-tune their work abilities, determine job preferences, and learn to work with growing independence.

    Program activities take place in a variety of community settings, including, work sites, the bank, public transportation and within other local businesses.

     

    ILC COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

    Self-Determination for Life 1.0 Credit Grades 9-12
    Self-determination skills, such as self-advocacy and self-awareness, have the potential to increase successful secondary and postsecondary outcomes for students with disabilities. This class will prepare students to use their IEP and 504 plans to access school, post-secondary opportunities, and employment accommodations and supports. Students will learn about the Special Education Process and laws that protect them and how rights and responsibilities change into adulthood. Students will take an internal look at what they need to be successful and use effective communication skills.

    Adaptive Emerging Leaders 0.5 Credit Grades 9-12
    The Adaptive Emerging Leaders class combines experiential and project-based learning to empower students to make a difference on their campus, community, and world. Through small group discussions, team building activities and community engagement, students will actively pursue topics such as volunteering, jobs, recreation, leisure, and traditions. Additionally, students will further their independence with an increased focus on social strategies, self-advocacy, employ-ability, communication, and daily living skills.

    Interpersonal Relations 0.5 Credit Grades 9-12
    Interpersonal Relations encourages self-examination and critical thinking relative to adult living. Areas of study include understanding oneself and others, dating, long-term committed relationships, family systems, financial responsibility, parenting, and the life cycle. The class will also investigate how to communicate in the community and workplace. The course content encourages the development of the skills necessary for successful relationships in today’s changing world.

    Current Events 0.5 Credit Grades 9-12
    This social studies course focuses on world and local issues that affect students’ everyday lives, such as economics, government and conflict. This course uses newspapers, online media, cartoons, and newscasts to support class discussion. Additionally students participate in group projects, presentations and work with primary source materials and opinion pieces in order to better understand the world around them.

    Adaptive Social Etiquette 0.5 Credit Grades 9-12
    Understanding social environments whether it is general education classrooms, preparing for a job interview, learning how to feel confident at social events, dining in a restaurants with their family, or interviewing with a college admissions counselor or service counselor, this class will give students the tools and skills to gain the confidence they will need to successfully handle these situations. This confidence will provide students with motivation and enthusiasm.

    Supporting Writing Responses in History 0.5 Credit Grades 9-12
    Using historical nonfiction and fiction text, and primary source documents, students will develop skills in analytical reading, writing in perspective of historical figures, identifying and articulating claims, making use of the work of others, synthesizing and incorporating evidence, effective structuring of writing, and addressing counterarguments and conflicting evidence. These supported and modified writing experiences will be used for students to develop proficiency to pass the MCAS.

    Adaptive Family and Consumer Science 1.0 Credit Grades 9-12
    Adaptive FACS is an exploratory overview of the facets of Family and Consumer Science. Students will learn about communication and relationship skills, housing, fashion and apparel, and nutrition and foods through hands-on experiences designed for unique learners. Additionally, transitional readiness skill areas will be addressed across the area(s) of employ-ability, self-advocacy, daily living and social strategies. This class will have a community based instruction component.

    Career Exploration and Practices 1.0 Credit Grades 9-12
    This course focuses on the skills students need to be successful in the transition from school to work. Students will participate in either campus-based or off-campus non-paid work experiences to enhance the educational experience. Students will participate in meaningful career exploration; learn and practice positive work attitudes, behaviors, and skills; learn first-hand about employers expectations. Students will learn and practice self-advocacy and problem-solving skills in the workplace. These community opportunities will assist the student to establish goals for the future and to prepare to transition from high school to adult life.

    Environmental Science ILC (NL) 1.0 Credit Grades 9-12
    Students will identify and research environmental issues and practice scientific protocols while investigating environmental problems. This course includes topics in pollution, water systems, population dynamics, ecosystems, agriculture, forestry, mining, fossil fuels, alternative energy, and global change. An emphasis will be placed on students using critical thinking and analytical skills to make a positive impact on the environment. The curriculum is modified to meet the instructional needs of each individual student. This is a lab based course meant only for students in the ILC program.

    PG Science ILC (NL) 1.0 Credit Grades 9-12
    This course is designed to target four areas of science-related transition topics: Hygiene, Safety, Nutrition, Plants. In the hygiene unit, students will learn how to take care of basic needs including hand washing, nail care, toileting and showering.  They will learn appropriate ways to take care of themselves and their homes.  Students will learn how care for themselves and others when they are sick.  In the safety unit, students will learn about chemical safety, health safety, and what to do when faced when an emergency. In the nutrition unit, students will explore healthy and unhealthy eating as they plan meals.  They will learn about the digestive system and how food affects our bodies. Finally, the plant unit students will discover the unique properties of plants.  They learn that plants are living things and determine how to identify an item as living or nonliving. Students explore the various uses for plants in our lives, and they will start and tend to a classroom garden in our courtyard. This is a lab based course meant only for students in the ILC program.

    ILC Biology (NL) 1.0 Credits Grades 9-12
    This course covers all the major topics of a high school Biology course which includes cell structure and function, ecology, genetics, evolution, organism structure and function and the molecular basis for life. Students regularly solve problems, analyze data and perform lab work. Cooperative learning is encouraged as is independent study. The material and curriculum is modified to meet the instructional needs of each student. This is a lab based course meant only for students in the ILC program.

    Life Skills Science ILC (NL) 1.0 Credit Grades 9-12
    This course is designed to target four areas of science-related transition topics: Hygiene, Safety, Nutrition, Plants. In the hygiene unit, students will learn how to take care of basic needs including hand washing, nail care, toileting and showering.  They will learn appropriate ways to take care of themselves and their homes.  Students will learn how to care for themselves and others when they are sick.  In the safety unit, students will learn about chemical safety, health safety, and what to do when faced when an emergency. In the nutrition unit, students will explore healthy and unhealthy eating as they plan meals.  They will learn about the digestive system and how food affects our bodies. Finally, the plant unit students will discover the unique properties of plants.  They learn that plants are living things and determine how to identify an item as living or nonliving. Students explore the various uses for plants in our lives, and they will start and tend to a classroom garden in our courtyard.This is a lab based course meant only for students in the ILC program.

    Consumer Math 1.0 Credit Grades 9-12
    Students in Consumer Math will learn the basics of managing money using a variety of math skills to compute weekly/annual wages, overtime hours, figuring tips, rounding money, as well as comparing gross pay to net pay. They will also examine checking/savings accounts, taxes, loans, and investments as they relate to financial planning.

    Everyday Math 1.0 Credit Grades 9-12
    Students in this class will gain a deeper understanding of numbers, how they are expressed and their basic operations. They will also explore a variety of measurement tools and their use as well as practice real-world measurement applications. Finally, students will learn the fundamentals of types of graphs, their parts, and basic graph interpretation. 

    TRANSITION COURSE DESCRIPTIONS


    Adaptive Emerging Leaders for Adult Life 0.5 Credit Grades PG
    The Adaptive Emerging Leaders for Adult Life class combines experiential and project-based learning to empower students to make a difference in their community and world. Through small group discussions, team building activities and community engagement, students will actively pursue topics such as volunteering, jobs, recreation, leisure, and traditions. Additionally, students will further their independence with an increased focus on social strategies, self-advocacy, employ-ability, communication, and daily living skills.

    Current Events 0.5 Credit Grades PG
    This social studies course focuses on world and local issues that affect students’ everyday lives, such as economics, government and conflict. This course uses newspapers, online media, cartoons, and newscasts to support class discussion. Additionally students participate in group projects, presentations and work with primary source materials and opinion pieces in order to better understand the world around them.

    Turning 22 0.5 Credit Grades PG
    Turning 22 will focus on the transition to adult life and services tailored to the specific individual. Topics include navigating DDS/MRC, identifying personal networks of support, what is an ISP, and learning about local agencies/ resources. There will be social lessons on topics such as dealing with change and entering new situations.

    Post-graduate Science and Safety (NL) 0.5 Credit Grades PG
    This course is designed to target four areas of science-related transition topics: Hygiene, Safety, Nutrition, Plants. In the hygiene unit, students will learn how to take care of basic needs including hand washing, nail care, toileting and showering.  They will learn appropriate ways to take care of themselves and their homes.  Students will learn how to care for themselves and others when they are sick.  In the safety unit, students will learn about chemical safety, health safety, and what to do when faced when an emergency. In the nutrition unit, students will explore healthy and unhealthy eating as they plan meals.  They will learn about the digestive system and how food affects our bodies. Finally, the plant unit students will discover the unique properties of plants.  They learn that plants are living things and determine how to identify an item as living or nonliving. Students explore the various uses for plants in our lives, and they will start and tend to a classroom garden in our courtyard.

    Home Economics (NL) 0.5 Credit Grades PG
    This hands-on course is designed to provide basic food preparation techniques and nutrition. The focus is on successful preparation of recipes, measuring techniques and sanitation.  Special emphasis is placed on adapting the dietary guidelines and the food pyramid/MyPlate to today’s lifestyles. Students will purchase ingredients, prepare meals, and sell food to staff during the lunch block in the RHS cafe.

    Personal Finance 0.5 Credit Grades PG
    This curriculum presents essential knowledge and skills to help students make informed decisions about real world financial issues. Students will learn to make educated spending, saving, and credit decisions and to make effective use of income to achieve personal financial success.

    Travel Training 0.5 Credit Grades PG
    In this course, students will learn how to access the community using various methods of travel. These methods include, but are not limited to using public transportation such as the bus or the train, how to use a rideshare app, how to call or hail a cab, how to coordinate with The Ride (MBTA), and how to use technology to map out the quickest and safest route to a particular destination. Students will also learn about or brush up on walking skills within the community, such as following road signs, using a crosswalk, or what to do in the face of an emergency when in the community.

    Communication in the Workplace 0.5 Credit Grades PG
    Students will use primarily on-line sources to learn how to respond to a job request, an interview request, email and physically write a professional thank you, email and physically write a personal thank you, research transportation options, complete bank applications, monitor a checking account balance and complete an apartment application.

    Employment Basics 0.5 Credit Grades PG
    Employment Basics focuses on the skills necessary to obtain and maintain employment. These include the common forms, business writing research, interview techniques,identification of personal skills and interests, job matching, and self-advocacy in the workplace.

    Personal Employment Visions 0.5 Credit Grades PG
    Personal Employment Visions focuses on setting personal goals vision in community-based employment and volunteering. Areas of study include personal goal setting, identification of individual skills and interests, identification of workplace expectancies, interpersonal skills in the workplace, post school training, financial aspects of employment.

VISUAL ARTS

  • The RHS Visual Arts Program provides learning opportunities where arts skills, critical thinking, and creative problem solving are emphasized. Central to this creative work is utilizing one's risk-taking, curiosity, and collaborative abilities. The Visual Arts Department strives to build student confidence and resilience, supporting the 21st century learning skills of our creative learners.  The curriculum focuses on developing technical proficiency and creative sensitivities, literacy in a variety of mediums and expressions, and multiple opportunities to develop a lifelong relationship with the arts. The department supports collaborative cross-curricular opportunities and encourages students to communicate and advocate through the Fine Arts, seeing this as an important life skill that extends into and complements all other disciplines.

    Students participating in the fine arts offerings will be responsible for understanding and applying the following content standards (The Massachusetts State Frameworks for Visual Arts). Students will:

    • Generate and conceptualize artistic ideas and work
    • Organize and develop artistic ideas and work
    • Refine and complete artistic work
    • Select, analyze and interpret artistic work for presentation
    • Develop and refine artistic techniques and work for presentation
    • Convey meaning through the presentation of artistic work
    • Perceive and analyze artistic work
    • Interpret intent and meaning in artistic work present

    051512 Introduction to Art (CP) 0.50 Credit Grades 9-12
    Introduction to Art focuses on basic drawing skills while learning about a variety of materials, tools and techniques. This half year elective studio art course includes demonstrations, in-class exercises, images and assignments.  If the student is interested, they may continue on to the full year Art I elective another school year. Note: This class does not fulfill the prerequisite to take Advanced Art II.

    051992 Mixed Media (CP) 0.50 Credit Grades 10-12
    This course will introduce the student to a variety of mixed media techniques. Students will explore the use of both traditional and non-traditional materials to create works of art. There will be a strong emphasis on personal expression and creative use of materials. NOTE: This is a studio art class; work will be completed in the art room. Previous art experience is not required but would be extremely helpful.

    051572 Painting Workshop (CP) 0.50 Credit Grades 10-12
    Paint is a unique medium for personal expression and visual style. Painting Workshop will expose the student/artist to traditional approaches, tools, surfaces and various styles artists have employed utilizing paint. This basic understanding of paint and painting will open the possibilities of personal expression and use of color. Materials include: watercolors, tempera, gouache and acrylics. An interest in using paint as a medium and some comfort with drawing is advised. NOTE: This is a studio art class; work will be completed in the art room. Previous art experience is not required but would be extremely helpful.

    051571 Advanced Painting Workshop (H) 0.50 Credit Grades 10-12
    This course requires a prerequisite and teacher recommendation: Successful completion of Painting Workshop accompanied with teacher recommendation. Advanced Painting is a continued study of visual expression and personal style using paint. Students are expected to build upon their knowledge of color theory, techniques, mediums, styled and art history acquired from Painting Workshop in order to work towards developing a portfolio of their own works the highlights their individual expression. This half year elective is an intense, student self- directed course in which students develop a style of individual expression with a strong emphasis on problem solving, creative solutions and independent work. Students will be expected to maintain a working portfolio for evaluation.

    051582 3D Studio Style Sculpture (CP) 0.50 Credit Grades 10-12
    Basic design principles related to aesthetics and structure of freestanding and relief sculpture will be explored by art students who enjoy working in the third dimension to visually articulate their vision. A range of materials (paper, clay, Papier-mâché, metal, plaster, wood, found objects and cardboard) will be manipulated to develop skills and produce creative forms. Sculpture constructions will include additive and subtractive techniques. There is a strong emphasis on safety, problem solving, creative solutions and independent work

    051581 Advanced Sculpture (H) 0.50 Credit Grades 11-12
    Prerequisite: Successful completion of 3D Studio Style Sculpture with teacher recommendation. (Only available one semester a year)
    Advanced Sculpture is a continued study of design principles as they relate to sculpture, types of sculpture, and sculpture materials. Students are expected to build upon their knowledge from 3D Studio Style Sculpture and work towards developing a style of individual expression. There is a strong emphasis on safety, problem solving, creative solutions and independent work

    051622 Commercial Art (CP) 0.50 Credit Grades 10-12
    This studio art course focuses specifically on the commercial aspects of art and potential careers in the arts. Some examples include: graphic design, illustration, fashion, industrial design, interior design, and architecture. A range of materials, tools and techniques will be utilized based on the specific study. NOTE: This is a studio art class; work will be completed in the art room. Previous art experience is not required but would be extremely helpful, as well as an interest in how art presents itself in your everyday life.

    051552 Art I (CP) 1.00 Credit Grades 9-12
    Art I is a full- year elective course. The first half of Art I is an intense drawing program designed to inform students on basic drawing skills while learning about a variety of materials, tools and techniques. Students will learn to see as the artist does. This is done with exercises that develop drawing and designing skills. The second half of this course enables the student to apply these skills to other materials such as paint, mixed media, printmaking and some sculpture. Students are expected to develop skills in problem solving, creative thinking, and self-expression. Some level of comfort with drawing and a willingness to work is a must!

    051542 Advanced Art II (CP) 1.00 Credit Grades 10-12
    Prerequisite: Successful completion of Art I and teacher recommendation

    051541 Advanced Art Ill (H) 1.00 Credit Grades 11-12
    Prerequisite: Successful completion of Advanced Art II and teacher recommendation

    051701 Art IV/Senior Portfolio (H) 1.00 Credit Grade 12
    Prerequisite: Successful completion of Art Ill and/or teacher recommendation
    The Advanced Art courses are designed for students who wish to develop artistic proficiency and the student considering college level study in art. These full year studio art electives are intense, student- directed classes with an emphasis on observational development and self-expression. Students will be encouraged to establish a style of individual expression as they become more familiar with the use of art elements, concepts, materials and techniques. There is a strong emphasis on problem solving, creative solutions and independent work. Students are expected to purchase and maintain a working sketchbook for class and personal use outside of class.  Increased independence is expected at each level.  Senior Portfolio students will complete a year long, theme-based, portfolio of work.

WELLNESS/PHYSICAL EDUCATION

  • Physical wellness and fitness are critical components to a student’s overall health. RHS strongly believes that physical fitness and health contribute positively to a student's academic achievements, allowing our students to be strong in body and mind. Students must take one semester of PE every year and earn 2 credits total towards graduation. Freshmen must take Wellness 9 and sophomores must take Wellness 10. Juniors and seniors have a variety of course options to fulfill their PE requirements, and students at all grade levels may take PE courses multiple times as desired. Transfer students do not need to make up any PE credit for years they were not enrolled at RHS, and waivers for the PE requirement are available for special circumstances.

    Waiver for Wellness/PE
    Students may be able to obtain a waiver for taking PE based on the following circumstances and must be approved by administration:

    • Students with double-block classes that represent significant scheduling issues. These include English Language Learner (ELL) classes and AP Math & Science classes.
    • Juniors or seniors participating in JV or Varsity sports – must be signed by the Athletic Director.
    • Any student with specific reasons and/or concerns about taking wellness should contact their guidance counselor.

    082019 Wellness 9 (CP) 0.50 Credit Grade 9
    Wellness 9 is a required course for freshmen. This course combines the study of health-related topics with the opportunity to participate in a variety of sports and recreational activities. Some of the health-related topics covered include alcohol and drug abuse, smoking, nutrition, stress management, and violence prevention.

    082010 Wellness 10 (CP) 0.50 Credit Grade 10
    Wellness 10 is a required course for sophomores. This course combines the study of health-related topics with the opportunity to participate in a variety of sports and recreational activities. Some of the health-related topics covered include the Male Reproductive System, Female Reproductive System, Pregnancy, Childbirth, STD’s, and HIV/AIDS. Please submit a request in writing to the Principal if you do not want your son/daughter to study topics that deal with sex education.

    080021 Team Sports I (CP) 0.50 Credit Grades 11-12
    Team Sports I is a balance of activities that include but are not limited to team sports such as: soccer, ultimate Frisbee, football, volleyball, and basketball. The program encourages sportsmanship and teamwork, and offers students a more traditional competitive athletic experience.

    080022 Team Sports II (CP) 0.50 Credit Grades 11-12
    Team Sports II is a balance of activities that include but are not limited to team sports (depending on class size) such as; wiffle ball, basketball, floor hockey, volleyball, mat ball. The program encourages sportsmanship and teamwork, and offers students a less competitive but physically active athletic experience.

    080041 Life Activities I (CP) 0.50 Credit Grades 11-12
    Prerequisite: Signature of Physical Education Teacher and Administrator
    Life Activities I explores social and physical growth through life long activities. This class is a balance of activities that include but are not limited to individual and dual activities such as bocce, Frisbee-golf, golf and badminton. The program encourages sportsmanship, cooperative learning and growth thus promoting an active physical and social lifestyle as an adult. Class is limited to 12 students. 

WORLD LANGUAGE

  • The RHS World Language (WL) program’s goal is to help students develop the cognitive skills necessary for language acquisition. The WL program currently offers two languages French and Spanish—so that students can achieve proficiency in at least one language other than English, and start realizing the benefits that multilingualism has to offer.

    Following the standards set by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL), the WL program places primary emphasis on real communication. ACTFL organizes the Communication standard into three modes: Interpersonal, Interpretive and Presentational. The WL program aims to prepare students to:

    • Become effective communicators using the language to engage in meaningful conversations
    • (interpersonal), to understand and interpret spoken language and written text (interpretive), and to present information, concepts, and ideas (presentational).
    • Collaborate using their native and acquired languages to learn from and work cooperatively across communities and cultures with global team members, sharing responsibility and making necessary compromises while working toward a common goal.
    • Frame, analyze, and synthesize information as well as negotiate meaning across language and culture in order to explore problems and issues from their own and different perspectives. Ultimately, students realize that people around the world have multiple ways of viewing and experiencing life.
    • Create and innovate to respond to new and diverse perspectives with respect and appreciation. Students use language in imaginative and original ways to make useful contributions, be agents of change, and pursue social justice at the local, national, and international levels.

    061212 French I (CP) 1.00 Credit Grades9-ll
    This introductory French course provides students with little or no knowledge of French with useful language skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing. Oral conversation is emphasized as students work in pairs/groups to use the target language. Course participants work weekly in the language lab in order to practice listening, speaking, and reading. Writing skills are developed through a systematic use of short paragraph writings and projects. The geography and culture of French-speaking countries are embedded in the text and video program. The students learn the basic building blocks of the language at a moderate pace. Students learn, and practice language related to daily themes of family, friends, school, and community. The success in this course is vital to future French language achievement. Students' proficiency will be measured through active participation, including but not limited to quizzes, tests, and homework.

    061211 French I (H) 1.00 Credit Grades 9-11
    Prerequisite: Grade of 85% or higher in eighth grade French and teacher recommendation
    This introductory French course provides students with little or no knowledge of French with useful language skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing. Oral conversation is emphasized as students work in pairs/groups to use the target language. Course participants work weekly in the language lab in order to practice listening, speaking, and reading. Writing skills are developed through a systematic use of short paragraph writings and projects. The geography and culture of French-speaking countries are embedded in the text and video program.

    The students learn the basic building blocks of the language at a quicker pace than the French I (CP) class. Students learn, and practice language related to daily themes of family, friends, school and community. The success in this course is vital to future French language achievement. Students' proficiency will be measured through active participation, including but not limited to quizzes, tests, and homework.

    061222 French II (CP) 1.00 Credit Grades 9-12
    Prerequisite: Final grade of 74% or higher in French I (CP)
    French II is designed for students who have completed the French I course, and the goal is for the students to attain the level of intermediate speakers of the language. The four basic skills of language study, listening, speaking, reading and writing will continue to receive attention while emphasis will continue on listening and speaking in order to solidify our goal of making our learning the language functional through oral usage. The class is taught at a moderate pace. To establish the desired communication between the teacher and the students, we shall review French I during the first few weeks of the first term. We shall conduct the class primarily in French. Active classroom participation, quizzes, tests, and homework will be used to measure students' proficiency. Overall, this course will meet the national standards as set by ACTFL (American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages) and follow the state guidelines.

    061221 French II (H) 1.00 Credit Grades 9-12
    Prerequisite: Grade of 80% or higher in French I (H) or grade of 90% or higher in French I (CP)
    French II is designed for students who have completed the French I course, and the goal is for the students to attain the level of intermediate speakers of the language. The four basic skills of language study: listening, speaking, reading and writing will continue to receive attention while emphasis will continue to be made on listening and speaking in order to solidify our goal of making our learning the language functional through oral usage. This course is taught at a more advanced pace. To establish the desired communication between the teacher and the students, we shall review French I during the first few weeks of the first quarter. We shall conduct the class primarily in French. Active classroom participation, quizzes, tests, and homework will be used to measure students' proficiency. Overall, this course will meet the national standards as set by ACTFL (American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages) and follow the state guidelines.

    061232 French III (CP) 1.00 Credit Grades 9-12
    Prerequisite: Final grade of 74% or higher in French II (CP) French Ill is designed for students who have completed the French II course. The goal is for the students to attain the level of advanced speakers of the language. Throughout this course, students will continue to develop all skills they have learned in French I & II such as listening, writing, reading, and speaking. With emphasis to continue to be made on the four basic language skills for fluency and functionality, students will learn, compare and contrast popular aspects of the target language. To establish the desired communication between the teacher and the students, we will review French II and focus on tier 2 and 3 vocabularies while developing connection with the literature and culture of the target language. The course will be conducted primarily in French. This course is taught at a moderate pace. Active classroom participation, quizzes, tests and homework projects etc., will be used to measure students' proficiency. Overall, this course will meet the national standards as set by the American Council on The Teaching of Foreign Languages and follow the state guidelines. We will therefore accentuate on communication, comparison, connection, culture and communities in order to provide a well-grounded knowledge of the target language to our students.

    061231 French Ill (H) 1.00 Credit Grades 9-12
    Prerequisite: Grade of 80% or higher in French II (H) or grade of 90% or higher in French II (CP)
    French Ill is designed for students who have completed the French II course. The goal is for the students to attain the level of advanced speakers of the language. Throughout this course students will continue to develop all skills they have learned in French I & II such as listening, writing, reading, and speaking. While emphasis will continue to be laid on the four basic language skills for fluency and functionality, students will learn, compare and contrast popular aspects of the target language. To establish the desired communication between the teacher and the students, we will review French II and focus on tier 2 and 3 vocabulary while developing connection with the literature and culture of the target language. The course will be conducted primarily in French. This course is taught at a more advanced pace. Active classroom participation, quizzes, tests and homework projects etc., will be used to measure students' proficiency. Overall, this course will meet the national standards as set by the

    American Council on The Teaching of Foreign Languages and follow the Massachusetts state guidelines. We will therefore accentuate on communication, comparison, connection, culture and communities in order to provide a well-grounded knowledge of the target language to our students.

    061242 French IV (CP) 1.00 Credit Grades 10-12
    Prerequisite: Final grade of 74% or higher French Ill (CP)
    French IV course provides a review of important concepts of French Ill and helps students strengthen their skill and proficiency levels in communication. Students are able to initiate and engage in conversation on a wide variety of topics and comprehend longer and more sophisticated readings about the contemporary French-speaking world. They will develop an appreciation of cultural customs through film, music, poetry, and legends. They will use advanced grammatical structures in both verbal and written communication.

    061241 French IV (H) 1.00 Credit Grades 10-12
    Prerequisite: Grade of 80% or higher in French Ill (H) or grade of 90% or higher in French Ill (CP)
    French IV course provides a review of important concepts of French Ill and helps students strengthen their skill and proficiency levels in communication. Students are able to initiate and engage in conversation on a wide variety of topics and comprehend longer and more sophisticated readings about the contemporary French-speaking world. They will develop an appreciation of cultural customs through film, music, poetry, and legends. They will use advanced grammatical structures in both verbal and written communication.

    061012 Spanish I (CP) 1.00 Credit Grades 9-11
    This introductory course provides beginning Spanish students with immediate useful language skills. With completion of this course, students will be able to greet and introduce people, describe themselves and others, and talk about their classes. Students will also be able to describe their families, their home, and order food in a restaurant. Cooperative learning is emphasized as students listen, speak, read and write in the target language. The students will learn basic skills of the language that are vital to success in future Spanish courses. Along with these skills, students will compare and contrast Hispanic cultures and traditions with their own culture.

    061011 Spanish I (H) / Spanish I (A) 1.00 Credit Grades 9-11
    Prerequisite: Grade of 85% or higher in 8th grade Spanish and/or teacher recommendation
    This introductory course provides beginning Spanish students with immediate useful language skills at a more accelerated pace than Spanish I CP. With completion of this course students will be able to greet and introduce people, describe themselves and others, and talk about their classes. Students will also be able to describe their families, their home, and order food in a restaurant. Cooperative learning is emphasized as students listen, speak, read and write in the target language. The students will learn basic skills of the language that are vital to success in future Spanish courses. Along with these skills, students will compare and contrast Hispanic cultures and traditions with their own culture.

    061022 Spanish II (CP) 1.00 Credit Grades 9-12
    Prerequisite: Final grade of 74% or higher in Spanish I (CP)
    The second-year Spanish course begins with a review of the concepts learned in Spanish I and continues to build students' knowledge of the Spanish language. Throughout this course, students will be able to talk about their friends and family, discuss what people do for a living, and describe daily activities. Students will also be able to describe where different people live. They will talk about the outcome of different events, discuss what people do for a living, and describe daily activities. Cooperative learning is emphasized as students listen, speak, read and write in the target language. Building upon the basic skills of the language, students will learn how to talk about the past and things that are current. Knowledge of these skills is vital to success in future Spanish courses. Along with these skills, students will compare and contrast Hispanic cultures and traditions with their own culture.

    061021 Spanish II (H) / Spanish II (A) 1.00 Credit Grades 9-12
    Prerequisite: Grade of 80% or higher in Spanish I (H) or grade of 90% or higher in Spanish I (CP)
    The second-year Spanish course begins with a review of the concepts learned in Spanish I and continues to build students' knowledge of the Spanish language at a more accelerated pace than Spanish II (CP). Throughout this course, students will be able to talk about their friends and family, discuss what people do for a living, and describe daily activities. Students will also be able to describe where different people live. They will talk about the outcome of different events, discuss what people do for a living, and describe daily activities. Cooperative learning is emphasized as students listen, speak, read and write in the target language. Building upon the basic skills of the language, students will learn how to talk about the past and things that are current. Knowledge of these skills is vital to success in future Spanish courses. Along with these skills, students will compare and contrast Hispanic cultures and traditions with their own culture.

    061032 Spanish Ill (CP) 1.00 Credit Grades 10-12
    Prerequisite: Final grade of 74% or higher in Spanish II (CP)
    Spanish Ill provides a review of Spanish II concepts and helps students to build student skills and proficiency levels, picking up in the blue book where they left off in the previous year. Spanish Ill students will not only study geography, history, and culture of Spanish-speaking nations, but will also continue to master the four language skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Students will be able to express ideas and events in the present, past, and future tenses, and will finish the year able to use a new speaking mode unique to the romance languages (Spanish, French, Italian, etc.). They will write advanced sentences and brief compositions, as well as present information and projects orally, either on their own or in groups as a skit. They will also read complex passages and articles and listen to authentic music from the Spanish speaking world. Within the course, students will discuss topics such as childhood, food shopping, the world around them, and vacations/travel. It is the department's intention that this course will pique student interest in the language and Spanish-speaking world, and students will gain more confidence in communicating in Spanish as they listen, read, speak, and write the language.

    061031 Spanish Ill (H) 1.00 Credit Grades 10-12
    Prerequisite: Grade of 80% or higher in Spanish II (H) or grade of90% or higher in Spanish II (CP)
    Spanish Ill provides a review of Spanish II concepts and helps students to build student skills and proficiency levels, picking up in the blue book where they left off in the previous year, at a more accelerated pace than Spanish Ill CP. Spanish Ill students will not only study geography, history, and culture of Spanish speaking nations, but will also continue to master the four language skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Students will be able to express ideas and events in the present, past, and future tenses, and will finish the year able to use a new speaking mode unique to the romance languages (Spanish, French, Italian, etc.). They will write advanced sentences and brief compositions, as well as present information and projects orally, either on their own or in groups as a skit. They will also read complex passages and articles and listen to authentic music from the Spanish speaking world. It is the department's intention that this course will pique student interest in the language and Spanish-speaking world, and students will gain more confidence in communicating in Spanish as they listen, read, speak, and write the language.

    061042 Spanish IV (CP) 1.00 Credit Grades 10-12
    Prerequisite: Final Grade of 74% or higher in Spanish Ill (CP)
    The Spanish IV course provides a review of important concepts of Spanish Ill and helps students strengthen their skill and proficiency levels in communication. Students are able to initiate and engage in conversation on a variety of topics and comprehend longer and more sophisticated readings about the contemporary Spanish-speaking world. They will develop an appreciation of cultural customs through film, music, poetry, and legends. Within the course, students will discuss topics such as vacations, friendship, inventions, family, art and music. Students will learn about the master Spanish writer Miguel de Cervantes de Saavedra, and the masters of art: Diego Velazquez, Pablo Picasso, and El Greco!

    061041 Spanish IV (H) 1.00 Credit Grades 10-12
    Prerequisite: Grade of 80% or higher in Spanish Ill (H) or grade of 90% or higher in Spanish Ill (CP)
    The Spanish IV course provides a review of important concepts of Spanish Ill and helps students strengthen their skill and proficiency levels in communication. Students are able to initiate and engage in conversation on a variety of topics and comprehend longer and more sophisticated readings about the contemporary Spanish speaking world. They will develop an appreciation of cultural customs through film, music, poetry, and legends. Within the course students will discuss topics such as vacations, friendship, inventions, family, art and music. Students will learn about the master Spanish writer Miguel de Cervantes de Saavedra, and the masters of art: Diego Velazquez, Pablo Picasso, and El Greco!

    061052 Spanish V (CP) 1.00 Credit Grade 12
    Prerequisite: Final grade of 74% or higher in Spanish IV (CP)
    This course is a continuation of Spanish IV. Students will demonstrate and continue to master the four skills: speaking, reading, writing and listening. There is an increasing emphasis on vocabulary and grammar, and from this, an increasing emphasis on reading comprehension and conversation. Students will be able to exchange opinions and make suggestions, express their likes, dislikes, abilities, emotions. Students will be able to discuss and write about everyday topics such as art, music, media, school, family, goals and aspirations. The class will continue to study, compare and contrast Hispanic culture and traditions with their own.

    061051 Spanish V (H) 1.00 Credit Grade 12
    Prerequisite: Grade of 80% or higher in Spanish IV (H) or grade of 90% or higher in Spanish IV (CP)
    This course is a continuation of Spanish IV. Students will demonstrate and continue to master the four skills: speaking, reading, writing and listening. There is an increased emphasis on vocabulary and grammar, reading comprehension and conversation. Students will be able to exchange opinions and make suggestions, express their likes, dislikes, abilities, emotions. Students will be able to discuss and write about everyday topics such as art, music, media, school, family, goals, and aspirations. The class will continue to study, compare and contrast Hispanic culture and traditions with their own.

    061125 Advanced Placement Spanish l.0 Credits Grade12
    Prerequisite: A final Grade of 80% or higher in Spanish IV (H) or grade of 90% or higher in Spanish IV (CP). Mandatory summer work. Any student who does NOT take the AP exam at the conclusion of the course will receive HONORS not AP credit on their transcript. A fee is associated with the course. AP Spanish students study the contemporary Spanish-speaking world. Students are able to initiate and engage in conversations on a wide variety of topics using advanced grammatical structures accurately. Students will write short compositions including informal and formal correspondence, biography, advertisements, informative articles and persuasive essays. They will read articles, short stories, novels, plays and continue their study of film and music.